Veranstaltungsarchiv

2022
Do. 14. Juli 2022 - Fr. 15. Juli 2022
Workshop "Taking up the Challenge" (A03)
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Donnerstag, 14. - 15. Juli 2022, 11:00 - 17:00 Uhr
‘Taking up the Challenge’ Workshop
 
Challenges competitions and prizes have long been used to advance or accelerate technological innovation. The world of robotics and automation is no different: the DARPAGrand Challenge first hosted in 2004 kick-started the development of autonomous vehicles. Yet as AI research itself has proliferated moving away from state-funded programmes to all manner of start-up research centre and big tech-driven initiatives the practice of hosting challenges has only intensified.
This workshop examines the phenomenon of such challenges as they seek to stimulate and structure AI autonomous vehicle and machine vision research in the field. The workshop considers the value of challenges to scientific and technological problem-solving and to the pursuit of scientific and technological solutions. It also aims to explore the value of challenges both to challenge organizers and challenge participants: why host them? Why participate? In this the workshop seeks to examine the political economy of AI research and how the terms of participation in such challenges are carefully prescribed by organizers. Challenges not only alert hosts to emerging talent but help in establishing feeder networks often constituting a successful ‘conveyor belt’ of computer scientists machine vision researchers and software engineers for organizers. Likewise in distributing and externalizing specific AI tasks challenges shrink associated labour costs of performing AI work to nominal levels. In participating however ordinarily young or novice researchers are offered the opportunity to tackle ‘cutting-edge’ industry problems with the promise of attracting the attention of a big tech company at the end.
Objective
  • Examine machine vision ‘challenges’ in autonomous vehicle research
  • Advance contemporary work on the political economy of AI in respect to how datamachine-learning cloud infrastructures computation highly-skilled labour start-ups and big tech firms contribute to the development of AI.
Organized by project A03 (Sam Hind, Max Kanderske, and Fernando van der Vlist)
 
The workshop will run from July 14-15 2022 in Siegen and online. It is intended to be an internal workshop and we invite participants from across SFB1187. External participants are welcome by invitation (please email sam.hind@uni-siegen.de).
Mi. 13. Juli 2022, 15:30 - 17:00 Uhr
Ringvorlesung: „Testing Infrastructures“ – Martin Tironi (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile): "Prototyping For More Than Human Futures"
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13. Juli 2022, 15:30 - 17:00 Uhr

"Prototyping For More Than Human Futures"

In this lecture, I will share some empirical and theoretical reflections on the notion of prototyping, proposing elements for a more-than-human and decolonial agenda on urban datafication processes. One of the main sources of pride of the promoters of the Smart initiatives that I have studied, is that their technologies are always humans oriented, promoting more human futures. The idea of human centred design is not only the bar used to measure “good design”. It is also the driver of various typologies of smart products, solutions, and innovations. I will propose the challenge of thinking about the digital beyond the anthropocentric notion of human-centred design, and repositioning the digital in the debates around more-than-human futures is an ethical responsibility. If Smart projects point to how to achieve more human futures, preferring white men and seriously impacting the nature of the planet, a challenge for decolonial design would be to prototype new urban experiences, assuming that futures are not exclusively designed by humans or for humans.

Martín Tironi is Associate Professor, School of Design at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. He is sociologist, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 2006. Master in Sociology, Sorbonne V, 2010. PhD, Center de Sociologie de l’Innovation, École des Mines de Paris, 2013. Post-doctorate, Center de Sociologie de l’Innovation, École des Mines de Paris, 2014. Visiting Fellow, Center for Invention and Social Process, Goldsmiths, University of London, 2018. Martin Tironi's research concerns digital sociology, design anthropology, the production and the maintenance of sociotechnical devices, and critical approach of smart cities and datafication. He is currently developing a research project (Fondecyt, 2021-2024) titled “Design Futures in the era of artificial intelligence and algorithmic prediction: problematizing the construction of technological futures in the Chilean context”. Before that, Martin developed another Fondecyt project titled “Datafication of urban environments and individuals: analyzing the designs, practices and discourses around the generation of digital data in Chile” (2018-2021) and Fondecyt project (2015-2018) on the circulation of the Smart City concept. His work has been published in The British Journal of Sociology (2020), Journal of Cultural Economy (2018), Environment and Planning D (2018), among others. Tironi was part of the curatorial team that won the gold medal in the London Design Biennale (2021) with the Pavilion “Tectonic resonance: from user-centered design to planet-oriented design”

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

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Veranstaltungsort

Online-Event
Mi. 13. Juli 2022, 14:15 - 15:30 Uhr
Ringvorlesung: „Testing Infrastructures“ – Anat Ben-David (Open University of Israel): "Testing compliance: Israel‘s repurposing of Secret Services surveillance technologies for Covid-19 Contact Tracing in 2020"
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13. Juli 2022, 14:15 - 15:30 Uhr

"Testing compliance: Israel’s repurposing of Secret Services surveillance technologies for Covid-19 Contact Tracing in 2020"

With the rapid unfolding of the COVID-19 global pandemic, Israel was one of the first states outside East Asia to impose involuntary surveillance measures to combat the virus. The government utilized the country’s permanent state of exception to bypass the parliament and deploy a hitherto classified anti-terrorism tool developed by its internal security service (Shin Bet) to track the location of COVID-19 patients and notify citizens who have been near an identified patient to self-quarantine. This talk explores the unprecedented repurposing of an anti-terrorism tool for addressing a civic health crisis through the lens of testing infrastructures. It argues that the mass infrastructural test was deployed as an a priori policy to generate compliance through securitization. This policy had to be justified at any price, including publishing compromised public data that hid the actual low-efficiency rates of Shin-Bet’s contact tracing.

The talk explores how data essentialism and securitization were used for solidifying the underlying infrastructural surveillance that made the Corona-tracking possible (Gekker & Hind, 2019). Then, following critique about the emergence of data gaps and inequalities in access to data during the pandemic in the global south (Milan and Treré 2020), I further portray gaps in the quality, quantity, and accessibility of two types of government pandemic data: data about the people – the secretive, mass-surveillance data used for infrastructural testing; and data for the people – the public, low-quality, incomputable reports for justifying mass surveillance. Finally, I illustrate these gaps by analyzing four infrastructural dataveillance practices used by the Israeli government in 2020: the repurposing of the Shin-Bet’s anti-terrorism infrastructure for contact tracing; an open-source contact tracing app; the “national index” dashboard that measured city-level compliance with lockdowns, created for the government by behavioral economist Dan Ariely; and the “Philosopher’s Stone” - a plan promoted by the Ministry of Defense to team up with the infamous espionage company NSO, to build an algorithmic system that would rank citizens by a ‘contagiousness risk factor.’

Anat Ben-David is an associate professor in the department of Sociology, Political Science and Communication at the Open University of Israel. She is co-founder of the Open University's Open Media and Information Lab (OMILab). Her primary research areas are Web history and web archives, Digital STS, critical data studies, and digital and computational methods for Web research.

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

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Veranstaltungsort

Room AH-A 217/18 of Herrengarten 3, 57072 Siegen
Mi. 13. Juli 2022, 10:00 - 11:30 Uhr
Werkstatt Medienpraxistheorie – "Network Map Making Workshop" – Workshop mit Mathieu Jacomy (Aalborg University)
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13. Juli 2022, 10:00 - 11:30 Uhr

This workshop about visual network analysis is open to all publics, with or without experience with the discipline. We will focus on the mechanics of reading a network map, and from there understand how to build them so that they are useful in practice. The workshop is mostly tool-agnostic, but we will use Gephi, a free network visualization tool, as our tool of choice, for those comfortable with it. We will also address the issue of building a narrative about a network, and how to mobilize the multiple layers of mediation involved, and notably the layout algorithm. Finally, we will engage with (and discuss) Gephisto, an experimental tool designed to produce network maps in one click (but with a catch!). This workshop will make it clear what to expect and not to expect of network maps, how to make them well, how to interpret them properly, and how to approach visual network analysis as an operational practice.

 

Mathieu Jacomy is post-doc at the TANT Lab in Copenhagen, and previously was research engineer at the Sciences Po médialab in Paris. Jacomy tweets at @jacomyma

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Di. 12. Juli 2022, 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr
Werkstatt Medienpraxistheorie – "Reappropriating Visual Network Analysis" – Lecture mit Mathieu Jacomy (Aalborg University)
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12. Juli 2022, 18:00 - 19:30 Uhr

Lecture: "Reappropriating Visual Network Analysis"

If the noema of big data visualization is “there is an order to that chaos”, then the study of digital traces calls to unveil the hidden structures of digitized society. Visual network analysis seems to promise such powers: complexity unfolding under your eyes! This begs two different kinds of questions. How does it work? But also: is this what we want to do?
Visual network analysis is already reappropriated in various places, like the teaching class and newsroom. As techniques circulate across fields and cultures, network practices change and get shaped in new ways. It is worth discussing different sides to this circulation. Some regrettable, like reusing network maps as marketing assets without containing their narrative powers, and some admirable, like reinventing the methodological commitments of algorithmic techniques inherited from distant fields. We will deconstruct what we see when we look at networks by exposing the gist of visual network analysis and questioning the notion of “community structure”, too often taken for granted. And finally, we will discuss the purpose and design of the apparatus we use to inquire into the complexity of digital traces.

 

Mathieu Jacomy is post-doc at the TANT Lab in Copenhagen, and previously was research engineer at the Sciences Po médialab in Paris. Jacomy tweets at @jacomyma

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Di. 12. Juli 2022, 12:15 - 13:45 Uhr
Gender & Diversity Lunch mit Dr. Simone Pfeifer
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12. Juli 2022, 12:15 - 13:45 Uhr

Gender & Diversity Lunch mit Dr. Simone Pfeifer

Dr. Simone Pfeifer arbeitet derzeit als Postdoktorandin im DFG-Gradiertenkolleg 2661: „anschließen-ausschließen - Kulturelle Dynamiken jenseits globaler Vernetzung“ an der Universität zu Köln. Gleichzeitig ist sie Associate Senior Research Fellow im Projekt „Dschihadismus im Internet: Die Gestaltung von Bildern und Videos, ihre Aneignung und Verbreitung“ am Institut für Ethnologie und Afrikastudien der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Sie promovierte an der Universität zu Köln zu sozialen Beziehungen und Medienpraktiken im transnationalen Alltag von Senegales*innen in Berlin und Dakar. Als wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin war sie Teil des Graduiertenkollegs "Locating Media. Simone wird über ihre Erfahrungen in Forschungsverbundprojekten, ihren Übergang in die Postdoc-Phase und - als Mutter von zwei Kindern - über die Vereinbarkeit von Familie und Wissenschaft sprechen.

 

Zur Reihe:
Die Reihe „Gender & Diversity Lunch“ lädt alle Mitglieder der SFBs „Medien der Kooperation“ und „Transformationen des Populären“ zu einem Austausch zu aktuellen Themen und Fragestellungen aus den Bereichen Gleichstellung, Diversity und Vereinbarkeit von Familie und Wissenschaft ein. Ziel der Reihe ist es, ein Networking zwischen SFB-Mitgliedern und Personen aus verschiedenen Bereichen und mit unterschiedlichen biografischen Erfahrungen zu ermöglichen. Zu jeder Veranstaltung wird eine Person zu einem bestimmten Thema eingeladen. Die Reihe findet in regelmäßigen Abständen zur Mittagszeit inklusive eines Imbisses statt. Vorschläge und Anregungen für Wunschthemen/-referent*innen sind jederzeit herzlich willkommen.

 

Ein Kooperationsformat der SFBs 1187 & 1472 zur Chancengleichheit

 

Anmeldung über Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de)

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 228
Mi. 06. Juli 2022, 14:15 - 16:15 Uhr
Forschungsforum - A02: The Culture of Telecommunication Standardisation in the Tensions of the Digital and Neoliberal ‘Double Revolution & Julia Bee
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06. Juli 2022, 14:15 - 16:15 Uhr

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

A02: The Culture of Telecommunication Standardisation in the Tensions of the Digital and Neoliberal ‘Double Revolution

 

15:15 – 16:15 Uhr

Julia Bee (Universität Siegen)

Bicycle Media and Cooperation

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Mi. 06. Juli 2022, 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr
MGK-Research Colloquium
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06. Juli 2022, 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr

12:00 – 13:00

Präsentation: Yarden Skop

(Dissertation Project: Studying the relationships between platform companies and publishers through the development and deployment of computational tools for content moderation and fact checking)

Discussant: Vesna  Schierbaum

 

13:00 – 14:00

Präsentation: Clara Fernández de Bobadilla Munoz

(Dissertation Project: Data in crisis: An ethnography of technical practices of/with data during the Covid-19 pandemic)

Discussant: Pip Hare

Mo. 04. Juli 2022 - Di. 05. Juli 2022
Workshop "Rethinking and Rebuilding: Grand Narratives in the History of Computing"
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Montag, 04. - 05. Juli 2022

This event is prompted by the publication of A New History of Modern Computing by Thomas Haigh and Paul Ceruzzi (MIT Press, 2021), a book that was planned and largely written under the auspices of Siegen University. As the most ambitious scholarly overview history of computing published this century, this book updates the grand narrative of computing history by drawing on new generations of scholarship. Topics such as digital media devices, videogames, home computing, computer networking, smartphones, cloud computing, and the evolution of the IBM PC standard are integrated into the overall story for the first time.


Yet our purpose here is less to celebrate the new book as to ask what it, and its silences, tell us about the potential to tell other stories on a similar scale about computers and their history. The workshop gathers scholars from fields such as media studies, the history of science and mathematics, and the history of AI to ask what a grand narrative of the history of computing might look like if told from other perspectives. What do Haigh and Ceruzzi get right, and what opportunities did they neglect? What topics and chapters would appear if the story was told in a different way? What would be the protagonists and the plots?

The most current program can be found over here

 

Organizers:
Thomas Haigh (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee & Siegen University)
Sebastian Giessmann (Siegen University)

Veranstaltungsort

Room 217/18 of Herrengarten 3, 57072 Siegen and online

Kontakt

Sebastian Gießmann
giessmann@medienwissenschaft.uni-siegen.de
Permalink
Mi. 29. Juni 2022, 14:15 - 16:00 Uhr
Ringvorlesung: „Testing Infrastructures“ – Beth Semel (MIT / Language and Technology Lab): “Can You Hear Me Now? Sanity Tests and Screening Difference in Machine Listening for Mental Health Care”
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29. Juni 2022, 14:15 - 16:00 Uhr

Can You Hear Me Now? Sanity Tests and Screening Difference in Machine Listening for Mental Health Care

In the United States, growing numbers of psychiatric and engineering professionals collaborate in attempts to build automated systems that conduct mental health screening based on the sounds of the voice alone. These “vocal biomarker” detection technologies propose to turn any utterance into clinically significant data, regardless of a speaker’s knowledge or interpretations of their psychological status. Dominant discourses surrounding these efforts frame the auditory superiority of artificial intelligence (AI) as key to unlocking a more efficient and equitable future for psychiatric medicine. They often describe AI as a “stethoscope” or “thermometer” for mental illness, implying a straightforwardly biological and quantitative measure detached from the sociocultural and political dimensions of the clinical encounter.

This talk explores the “sanity test”—a computer science term for assessing the desired functionality, i.e. “rationality,” of a model—as an alternative analogy for vocal biomarker systems that more aptly conveys the normative logics, social effects, and matrices of domination embedded within them. Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork with technologists and human test subjects whose sensory practices and voices shape how various vocal biomarker technologies will listen, I show that the boundary between “ill” and “well” bodies and subjects is in constant, contested flux throughout the design process.

 

Dr. Beth Semel is an incoming Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. Her ethnographic research combines linguistic anthropology, science and technology studies, disability studies, and sound studies to explore the sociopolitical life of automated voice analysis, focusing on efforts to integrate these AI-enabled technologies into the U.S. mental health care system. She is currently a postdoctoral associate in Anthropology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she received her PhD in History, Anthropology Science, Technology and Society (HASTS). She is also the co-founder and associate director of the Language and Technology Lab.

 

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

Gäste können sich per Mail anmelden 'Sende eine E-Mail'

Veranstaltungsort

Online-Event
Di. 28. Juni 2022 - Di. 28. Juni 2022
Infoveranstaltung: Kinderbetreuung an der Universität Siegen und Möglichkeiten der Bezuschussung
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Dienstag, 28. - 28. Juni 2022, 12:00 - 13:00 Uhr
Wenn Eltern Verantwortung für eine Familie tragen, kann die Vereinbarkeit von Beruf, Wissenschaft, Studium und Familie nur mit einer bedarfsgerechten und zuverlässigen Kinderbetreuung gelingen. Die Universität Siegen bietet zahlreiche Betreuungsmöglichkeiten, die wir Ihnen im Rahmen der Veranstaltung gerne vorstellen möchten. Anhand konkreter Fallbeispiele werden wir außerdem exemplarisch erläutern, wie der Betreuungsfonds der Universität Siegen bei der Vereinbarkeit von Beruf und Familie finanziell unterstützen kann und wie und unter welchen Bedingungen Reisekosten von Kind(ern) refinanziert werden können.
 
Bei Interesse bitten wir um eine kurze Anmeldung bei Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de). Die Veranstaltung ist in Deutsch geplant, kann aber bei Bedarf flexibel in Englisch durchgeführt werden. Falls Sie Englisch wünschen, teilen Sie uns dies bitte bis spätestens zum 21.06. mit. 
 
Für eine Betreuungsmöglichkeit für Ihr(e) Kind(er) ist während der Veranstaltung gesorgt. 
 
Die Veranstaltung findet in einem hybriden Setting statt. Der zoom-Link wird im Vorfeld verschickt.

Eine Veranstaltung in Kooperation mit dem SFB 1472 "Transformationen des Populären" und dem Gleichstellungsbüro der Universität Siegen

Veranstaltungsort

Universität Siegen
AH-A 228
Herrengarten 3
Siegen

Kontakt

Permalink
Mo. 27. Juni 2022, 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Online Event Series „Memory Under Fire“: Russian Disinformation
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27. Juni 2022, 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Russian Disinformation
 
The second event of the “Memory Under Fire” Online Event Series “Russian Disinformation” on June 27th will present research perspectives from Ukrainian scholars and practitioners on Russian disinformation practices and their implications.
We will welcome as guests:
 
  • Karyna Lazaruk, Visual Communication Specialist and Media Activist Institute of Mass Information Ukraine
  • Marc Tuters, Assistant Professor University of Amsterdam: "Bunk Debunkers: an Empirical Analysis of Russian Participatory War Propaganda on Telegram“
  • Svitlana Matviyenko, Assistant Professor, Simon Fraser University: "Communicative Militarism During the Russian War in Ukraine“
  • Maria Haigh, Associate Professor, Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Comenius visiting Professor, University of Siegen, Germany: "Fact-Checking After Truth: StopFake.org fact-checking methods from the Russia Hybrid War on Ukraine, 2014 to 2022“

 

The event series “Memory under Fire” focuses on data and archiving practices in times of war and conflict. With Ukraine as a focal point, we explore the dynamics of information disorder in our platform saturated media sphere. Russia’s full scale invasion of Ukraine has brought innumerable deaths and destruction in the physical sphere, and Russia’s aggression also continues in the digital space, where countless pieces of disinformation, hate speech and propaganda are spread. Additionally, the digital media dynamics of this war have been put front and centre: some call it ‘the first TikTok war’, others argue that Volodimir Zelenskiy and his country invented new ways to fight on the digital battlefield. Russia’s invasion and the ensuing ongoing war highlights both digital warfare and the many data practices that participate in, critique, document, and archive this war.

This current situation sheds light on the need to document and archive war experiences and war crimes for future researchers and generations. This is particularly relevant for both countering disinformation practices and preserving data and access to it digitally, when physical archival infrastructures are being destroyed.

For our event series, we host speakers from the fields of academia and praxis (e.g. Center for Urban History in Lviv, Bellingcat, Mnemonic, University of Amsterdam, Simon Fraser University, Underdog the Unlawyers and other institutions and fields of praxis) to discuss how this war is influenced by and changing our digital media sphere.

The previous first event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Academic Perspectives” on May 23th explored data archiving and creative resistance practices in Ukraine and its diaspora featuring Taras Nazaruk from the Center for Urban History in Lviv and Kateryna Iakovlenko from the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna.
 
The second event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners‘ Perspectives on June 13th focused on archiving war and human rights violations from the critical data practice perspectives in the fields of journalism and NGOs. We hosted Charlotte Godart, investigator and lead of the Global Authentication Project at Bellingcat, Dia Kayyali, Associate Director of Advocacy at Mnemonic, and Olga Lubiv, Analyst at Underdog the Unlawyers, Kyiv, Ukraine.

 

We invite the public to participate in the series of events by registering via migle.bareikyte@uni-siegen.de or yarden.skop@uni-siegen.de for a Zoom link.

Veranstaltungsort

Online
Mi. 22. Juni 2022, 9:00 - 11:00 Uhr
Research Tech Lab: "Memespector GUI Hands-On Session" with Jason Chao
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22. Juni 2022, 9:00 - 11:00 Uhr

Research Tech Lab Hands-on Session on Memespector-GUI

Memespector-GUI is a tool to enrich image datasets using computer vision APIs.  This hands-on session will guide the participants to obtain access tokens from proprietary APIs, use Memespector-GUI to invoke the APIs and interpret the outputs of the APIs.

Participants may use Memespector-GUI on a computer running Windows, Mac OS or Linux (with Ubuntu 16.04/18.04/20.04 with desktop environment installed).  A test dataset will be made available during the session.  The participants may also use their own image dataset.

The session will be delivered in hybrid mode. In-person attendees will benefit from technical assistance on-site, which usually provides more speedy solutions to technical issues.

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Mi. 22. Juni 2022, 14:15 - 16:15 Uhr
Forschungsforum - B06: "Smarte Technologien in häuslicher Interaktion: Konsumpraktiken und Nachhaltigkeit zwischen Selbst- und Fremdbeobachtung" (Arbeitstitel) | A06: Visual Integrated Clinical Cooperation
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22. Juni 2022, 14:15 - 16:15 Uhr

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

B06: "Smarte Technologien in häuslicher Interaktion: Konsumpraktiken und Nachhaltigkeit zwischen Selbst- und Fremdbeobachtung" (Arbeitstitel)

 

15:15 - 16:15 Uhr

A06: Visual Integrated Clinical Cooperation

Veranstaltungsort

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Mi. 22. Juni 2022, 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr
MGK-Research Colloquium
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22. Juni 2022, 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr

12:00 – 13:00

Präsentation: Vesna Schierbaum

(Dissertation Project: Discursive construction and mediations of the sensory crowd)

Discussant: Fernando van der Vlist

 

13:00 – 14:00

Presentation: Fernando van der Vlist

(Dissertation Project: Digital platforms as governing information systems)

Discussant: Clara Ferná ndez de Bobadilla Munoz