News

19 September 2020
Job advertisement: Two doctoral positions for research assistants (100%); Digital Humanities, (Socio-)Informatics or data science
CRC 1187 „Media of Cooperation“ is offering two fulltime doctoral positions with a context in the...
Job advertisement: Two doctoral positions for research assistants (100%); Digital Humanities, (Socio-)Informatics or data science

CRC 1187 „Media of Cooperation“ is offering two fulltime doctoral positions with a context in the digital humanities, (socio-)informatics or data science. Applications are due 01. October 2020.

The University of Siegen is an interdisciplinary and cosmopolitan university with currently about 18,000 students and a range of subjects from the humanities, social sciences and economics to natural, engineering and life sciences. With over 2,000 employees, we are one of the largest employers in the region and offer a unique environment for teaching, research and further education.

CRC 1187 “Media of Cooperation“

The CRC is an interdisciplinary research network consisting of 15 projects and more than 60 scientists from the fields of media studies, science and technology studies, ethnology, sociology, linguistics and literature studies, computer science and medicine as well as history, education and engineering. It has been funded by the DFG since 2016. The CRC investigates the emergence and dissemination of digitally networked, data-intensive media and understands these as cooperatively accomplished conditions for cooperation. The research of the participating subprojects focuses on data practices that are explored in the situated interplay of media practices, infrastructures and public spheres.

Further information on the CRC’s research agenda and subprojects can be found at https://www.mediacoop.uni-siegen.de/en

We are looking for:

Starting on 1 January 2021, two doctoral posts in digital humanities, (socio-)informatics, human-computer interaction or data science (with a focus on media research) are available at the University of Siegen in the integrated graduate school (MGK) of the German Research Foundation (DFG) Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1187 “Media of Cooperation”, subject to the following conditions:

  • 100% = 39,83 weekly hours
  • Pay group 13  TV-L
  • temporary 31.12.2023

Your tasks:

  • Independent conception and realisation of a research project in the thematic area of the CRC, especially in the field of development and ethnographic research of a digital practice (augmented reality, artificial intelligence, social robotics, machine learning, sensor-based media, conversational interfaces, among others)
  • Regular participation and involvement in the events and the training program of the MGK (colloquia, workshops, summer schools, methodology workshops, interdisciplinary groups)
  • Presentation of preliminary results of the individual research project within the MGK colloquium and in the context of relevant (international) conferences

Your profile:

  • Relevant, above-average degree in one of the following disciplines participating in or related to the CRC: digital humanities, (socio-)informatics, business information science, human-computer interaction, data science, information systems, or similar (equivalent to a Master’s degree)
  • Individual research project in one of the above-mentioned disciplines within the subject area of the CRC, specifically in the development and research of a digital practice with a qualitative approach (project outline of max. 10 pages, including a work plan; please make explicit the connection to the research framework of the CRC)
  • Interest in methods of media research, praxeological research approaches and an affinity for working in an interdisciplinary research environment
  • Willingness to participate in the international event program of the CRC and the MGK
  • Good written and spoken English language skills

Our offer:

  • Suport for further academic qualification (doctorate), in compliance with the Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz
  • Many opportunities of co-creating the program of the Integrated Graduate School
  • A number of offers like flexible work hours, university pension scheme, dual career service, coaching/mentoring and a comprehensive personnel development program

 

Applications (letter of motivation, curriculum vitae, copies of certificates, letter of recommendation by a university lecturer referring to the intended research project, outline (max. 10 pages) of a project idea plus bibliography and work plan) are possible until 01.10.2020.

Contact:

Dr. Timo Kaerlein

0049 (0)271 / 740 – 5251

19 September 2020
Job advertisement: Four doctoral positions for research assistants (65%); Cultural and Social Studies, Media Research
The CRC 1187 „Media of Cooperation“ is offering four doctoral positions (65%) with a background in...
Job advertisement: Four doctoral positions for research assistants (65%); Cultural and Social Studies, Media Research

The CRC 1187 „Media of Cooperation“ is offering four doctoral positions (65%) with a background in cultural and social studies (media research). Applications are due 01. October 2020.

The University of Siegen is an interdisciplinary and cosmopolitan university with currently about 18,000 students and a range of subjects from the humanities, social sciences and economics to natural, engineering and life sciences. With over 2,000 employees, we are one of the largest employers in the region and offer a unique environment for teaching, research and further education.

 

CRC 1187 “Media of Cooperation“

The CRC is an interdisciplinary research network consisting of 15 projects and more than 60 scientists from the fields of media studies, science and technology studies, ethnology, sociology, linguistics and literature studies, computer science and medicine as well as history, education and engineering. It has been funded by the DFG since 2016. The CRC investigates the emergence and dissemination of digitally networked, data-intensive media and understands these as cooperatively accomplished conditions for cooperation. The research of the participating subprojects focuses on data practices that are explored in the situated interplay of media practices, infrastructures and public spheres.

Further information on the CRC’s research agenda and subprojects can be found at https://www.mediacoop.uni-siegen.de/en

 

We are looking for:

Starting on 1 January 2021, four doctoral posts in cultural and social studies (media research) are available at the University of Siegen in the integrated graduate school (MGK) of the German Research Foundation (DFG) Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1187 “Media of Cooperation”, subject to the following conditions:

  • 65% = 25,89 weekly hours
  • Pay group 13  TV-L
  • temporary 31.12.2023

Your tasks:

  • Independent conception and realisation of a research project in the thematic area of the CRC, especially invited are ethnographic research projects of digital practices
  • Regular participation and involvement in the events and the training program of the MGK (colloquia, workshops, summer schools, methodology workshops, interdisciplinary groups)
  • Presentation of preliminary results of the individual research project within the MGK colloquium and in the context of relevant (international) conferences

Your profile:

  • Relevant, above-average degree in one of the following disciplines participating in or related to the CRC: media studies, anthropology, geography, history, cultural studies, literary studies, linguistics, political science, education, sociology, science and technology studies, or similar (equivalent to a Master’s degree)
  • Individual research project in one of the above-mentioned disciplines within the subject area of the CRC, specifically in the field of historical or contemporary qualitative research of a digital practice (project outline of max. 10 pages, including a work plan; please make explicit the connection to the research framework of the CRC)
  • Interest in methods of media research, particularly praxeological research approaches and an affinity for working in an interdisciplinary research environment
  • Willingness to participate in the international event program of the CRC and the MGK
  • Good written and spoken English language skills

Our offer:

  • Suport for further academic qualification (doctorate), in compliance with the Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz
  • Many opportunities of co-creating the program of the Integrated Graduate School
  • A number of offers like flexible work hours, university pension scheme, dual career service, coaching/mentoring and a comprehensive personnel development program

 

Applications (letter of motivation, curriculum vitae, copies of certificates, letter of recommendation by a university lecturer referring to the intended research project, outline (max. 10 pages) of a project idea plus bibliography and work plan) are possible until 01.10.2020.

Contact:

Dr. Timo Kaerlein

0049 (0)271 / 740 – 5251

07 January 2020
Recent book publication: “The History of Gulfport Field 1942” by Harold Garfinkel
Figure: Auto pilot mock-up discussed in „The History of Gulfport Field 1942“ This volume makes...
Recent book publication: “The History of Gulfport Field 1942” by Harold Garfinkel

Figure: Auto pilot mock-up discussed in „The History of Gulfport Field 1942“

This volume makes available for the first time an unpublished report of wartime research, titled “The History of Gulfport Field 1942”, written by Harold Garfinkel, for the US Army Air Forces (AAF) in 1943. The report has both historical and sociological significance. It has value as a historical document that presents in great detail how AAF personnel involved in training aircraft mechanics at one site (Gulfport Field, Mississippi) managed to contend with the rapid construction and deployment of training necessitated by World War II, with its accompanying shortages of material and experienced trainers, and surpluses of persons to be trained. In the face of shortages, AAF commanders adopted a set of practical aims for the school that downplayed the importance of conventional instruction and relied more on “hands on” practice and “the will to win”. This strategy emphasized a priority of practice over theory that is particularly relevant to the development of Garfinkel’s program of ethnomethodology, his later hybrid studies of work and science, and their relationship to debates in sociology. The book contains a 48-page afterword by Michael Lynch and Anne Rawls.

You can order the facsimile edition (69,00 € incl. VAT) by sending an email to katharina.dihel@uni-siegen.de

03 December 2019
Jahrestagung SFB “Medien der Kooperation” 2019 Nachbericht
Sorry, this entry is only available in German.Autor: Manuel Müller (Teilprojekt Ö) Vom 24. bis zum...
Jahrestagung SFB “Medien der Kooperation” 2019 Nachbericht

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Autor: Manuel Müller (Teilprojekt Ö)

Vom 24. bis zum 26. Oktober 2019 fand an der Universität Siegen die vierte Jahrestagung des Sonderforschungsbereichs “Medien der Kooperation” statt. Unter dem Titel “Data Practices: Recorded, Provoked, Invented” stellten Wissenschaftler*innen aus sieben Ländern Ergebnisse und neue Ansätze im Bereich der sogenannten “Datenpraktiken” vor.

Der Sonderforschungsbereich 1187 “Medien der Kooperation” ist eine interdisziplinäre Gruppe von 15 Projekten mit über 60 Mitarbeiter*innen aus elf Fachbereichen der Universität Siegen. Diese diversen Forschungsgruppen verbindet ein gemeinsames Interesse an digitalen Medien und neuen Formen und Praktiken der Kooperation. Von seiner Gründung an war es ein erklärtes Ziel des SFB, die oft scheinbar unübersichtliche und sich ständig verändernde digitale Welt verständlicher und ihre historischen Kontexte erkenntlicher zu machen.

Ein zentrales Ergebnis der Forschung im SFB ist die Erkenntnis, dass zunehmend alle Medienpraktiken auch als Datenpraktiken verstanden werden müssen. Wer mit digitalen Medien zu tun hat, produziert Daten, sei es als Datenspur von Aktivitäten im Netz, in Form der Kuration von Bildern und Videos auf Plattformen, oder in der Archivierung und dem Teilen von Forschungsdaten durch Wissenschaftler*innen. Diese Datenpraktiken sind für viele Disziplinen interessant. Entsprechend war die Auswahl an Wissenschaftler*innen, die ihre Forschungsergebnisse und neue Ansätze im Verlaufe der drei Tage vortrugen, divers aufgestellt. Die Tagung wurde in sechs Themenbereiche aufgeteilt. Zusammen mit zwei Keynote-Vorträgen entstand so ein Überblick über die weitreichenden Einflüsse und möglichen Betrachtungsweisen von “Datenpraktiken”.

Die Jahrestagung begann am Donnerstag, den 24.10., mit dem Themenbereich “Histories of Data Practices”. Beide Vorträge des Bereichs präsentierten historische Beispiele für Interaktionen zwischen Menschen und Daten, die schon vor der Digita-lisierung vorhanden waren und sich bis in die Gegenwart fortsetzen. Liam Cole Young, Assistant Professor an der Carleton University in Kanada, unternahm dies mit seinem Vortrag “Pop Music Charts and the Metadata of Culture” am Beispiel der “Billboard Hot-100”-Musikcharts. Musikcharts, so Young, seien beispielhaft für den Einfluss von Listen auf bestehende und neue Ordnungs- und Wissenspraktiken. Dr. Tahani Nadim von der Humboldt-Universität Berlin thematisierte in ihrem Vortrag “Capturing data creatures” unterschiedliche Katalogisierungsformen in Naturkundemuseen. Von der historischen Beschriftung einzelner Exponate durch Kurator*innen bishin zum digitalen “Barcode” wurden langanhaltende und komplizierte Verknüpfungen von Entscheidungsträgern, Praktiken und Objekten in Museen erkenntlich gemacht.

In der ersten Keynote sprach Prof. Celia Lury von der Universität Warwick unter dem Titel “People Like You: The distributive uncertainties of personalising (data) practices” über die Beziehung zwischen dem aktuellen Hang zu Personalisierung und Datenpraktiken. An zwei scheinbar unterschiedlichen Beispielen – britischen Brustkrebs-Studien und der #metoo-Bewegung – beschrieb Lury ein Konzept konstruierter “Vergleichbarkeit”.

Der zweite Tag begann mit dem Themenbereich “Automation and Agency”. In den drei Vorträgen dieses Bereichs ging es um die Interaktionen menschlicher Akteure in und mit einer immer mehr von Automatismen und Algorithmen gesteuerten Lebens- und Arbeitswelt. So beschrieb Dr. Nathaniel O’Grady von der Universität Manchester das Beispiel von LinkNYC, einer kostenlosen öffentlichen WLAN-Infrastruktur in New York, und insbesondere deren Rolle als automatisiertes Notrufsystem. Dieses neue System und die damit verbundenen Logiken, so O’Grady, haben enorme Auswirkungen auf bestehende Autoritätskonzepte und Entscheidungsfindungen im Bereich urbaner Sicherheit. Malte Ziewitz, Professor an der amerikanischen Cornell University, beschrieb in seinem Vortrag “Black Hat, White Hat” ethische Problematiken im Bereich der Suchmaschinen-Optimierung (SEO). Basierend auf Feldforschung mit britischen SEO-Beratern schilderte Ziewitz eine vielschichtige Situation, in der die Manipulation von Algorithmen durch Expert*innen neue Probleme von Legalität und Ethik aufwirft. Diese lassen sich nicht einwandfrei in vorhandene moralische Kategorien einordnen. Im letzten Vortrag des zweiten Themenbereichs sprach Eva-Maria Nyckel von der Humboldt-Universität Berlin über Datenpraktiken im Bereich des Prozessmanagements. Anhand der Plattform “Salesforce” untersuchte sie die Auswirkungen solcher Systeme auf medienwissenschaftliche Perspektive – besonders in Hinsicht auf die Registrierung und Kontrolle von Arbeitsprozessen.

Im dritten Themenbereich, “Data Ethnography”, ging es in erster Linie um die Schnittstelle zwischen Datenpraktiken und ethnographischer Forschung. So begann Dr. Emma Garnett vom King’s College London in “Sensing Bodies” mit einer Diskussion über den Nutzen neuer und kostengünstiger Sensortechnik in Studien über Luftverschmutzung direkt am menschlichen Körper. Diese neue, enge Beziehung zwischen Technologie und Mensch wirft Fragen nach der Auswahl und Ethik von Testsubjekten in so bisher kaum untersuchten Feldern auf. Dr. Tommaso Venturini, Forscher am französischen Zentrum für Internet und Gesellschaft, brachte dem Publikum in “Sprinting with Data” ein in den Sozial-wissenschaften noch neues Konzept näher: In sogenannten “Data-Sprints” kollaboriert eine Gruppe interdisziplinärer Forscher an einem gemeinsamen Datensatz. Venturini diskutierte grundlegende Konzepte hinter solchen “Sprints” und gab Hinweise für die Organisation datengetriebener Forschungstreffen. Im dritten Vortrag, “Unexpected openings in data ethnography”, sprach Prof. Minna Ruckenstein von der Universität Helsinki über das Projekt “Citizen Mindscapes”. Die Kollaboration von Ethnograph*innen mit Moderator*innen der Webseite “Suomi24” in der Auswertung von Millionen Foreneinträgen aus 15 Jahren führte zu neuen Ansätzen und Ideen über die Produktion und Nutzung von großen Datenmengen im Internet. Im letzten Vortrag des Themenbereichs sprach Dr. Robert Seyfert von der Universität Duisburg-Essen über Schwierigkeiten in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung von selbstfahrenden Fahrzeugen. Eine überhastete Fokussierung auf noch gar nicht existente Techniken berge die Gefahr der Überschätzung und Fehleinschätzung “autonomer” Fahrzeuge. Seyfert sprach sich für eine realistischere Neuausrichtung der Debatte aus, in der es in erster Linie um die Kooperation zwischen Menschen und Maschinen gehe.

Der vierte Themenbereich, “Digital Care”, beinhaltete Vorträge über die Nutzung von Datenpraktiken in medizinischen Anwendungsbereichen. Julia Kurz und Dmitri Presnov von der Universität Siegen sprachen in “Data Multiple” über die Sammlung und Auswertung komplexer Datenfelder in Krankenhäusern; sie stellten dabei besonders die Integration von Daten in den Arbeitsbetrieb als notwendig heraus. Isabel Schwaninger von der TU Wien brachte in ihrem Vortrag “Older Adults, Trust and Robots” das Konzept des Vertrauens in die Diskussion. Die Beziehung zwischen Mensch und Maschine im Bereich der Altenpflege sei stark abhängig von Vorstellungen über die Vertrauenswürdigkeit solcher Roboter. Durch aktive Konversation zwischen Forscher*innen und Patient*innen könnten Vorurteile abgebaut und Vertrauen geschaffen werden. Zuletzt sprach Dr. Kate Weiner von der Universität Sheffield in “Everyday curation” über die Herausforderungen medizinischer Selbstüberwachung. Ihre Forschung legt nahe, dass Forscher*innen mit einem komplexen Netzwerk aus Entscheidungen, Fehlern und Interpretationen arbeiten müssen, das keineswegs unproblematisch auszuwerten ist. Die Rolle von Patient*innen als Akteur*innen statt als Datenmenge müsse dabei im Vordergrund stehen.

In einem gesonderten Vortrag berichteten Andreas Mertgens und Patrick Sahle über verschiedene Ansätze der Digitalisierung von Archiven, am Beispiel des Nachlasses des amerikanischen Soziologen Harold Garfinkel. Sie zeigten diverse Möglichkeiten, darunter etwa nonlineare Darstellungsformen oder die Nutzung neuer 3D-Scantechniken, um die Inhalte eines so umfangreichen Archivs für die Forschung nutzbar zu machen.

Die zweite Keynote der Tagung wurde von David Ribes von der Universität Washington gehalten. Unter dem Titel “The Logic of Domains” stellte er seine Überlegungen zur Universalität von Domänen und “Domänenunabhängigkeit” vor, die seiner Meinung nach eine wichtige Erklärung für den weitreichenden Siegeszug der Data Science bietet. Deren Fähigkeit, sich scheinbar ohne Probleme in alle möglichen Felder zu integrieren, läge nicht unerheblich daran, dass IT sich als “unabhängige” und modulare Wissenschaft verkaufen konnte.

Zum Abschluss des Tages wurde Prof. em. Dr. Helmut Schanze anlässlich seines 80. Geburtstages mit einer Laudatio und einem Sektempfang geehrt. Schanze war als Germanist und Medienhistoriker wegweisend und begründend für die Medienforschung an der Universität Siegen. Er hatte hier 1985 den Sonderforschungsbereich “Bildschirmmedien” mitbegründet, dessen Sprecher er von 1992 bis 2000 war. Seine Leistungen für die deutsche Medienwissenschaft wurden vor internationalem Publikum besonders geehrt.

Der dritte und letzte Tag der Jahrestagung begann mit dem Themenbereich “Opening Data: Policies and Practices of Research Data Management”. Die drei Vorträge dieses Bereichs behandelten das hochaktuelle Stichwort “Open Data” kritisch und hinterfragten Methoden und Prämissen offener Forschungssysteme. Gaia Mosconi von der Universität Siegen wies in “Three Gaps in Opening Science” auf signifikante Probleme in der Umsetzung “offener Wissenschaft” hin. Inkongruenzen zwischen Konzept und Praxis seien dabei ebenso zu bedenken wie ein Mangel an Werkzeugen und Arbeitsprozessen. Ähnlich kritisch äußerte sich Prof. Wolfgang Kraus von der Universität Wien in seinem Vortrag “Setting up an ethnographic data archive”. Bekannten Prämissen von “Open Data” über Universalität und Eigentümerschaft von Daten setzte er ethnographische Positionen entgegen. Explizit warnte er vor einer “verallgemeinernden” Datennutzung, die Kontext oder Hintergründe der gesammelten Daten außer Acht lässt. Das Konzept der Offenheit selbst kritisiert dann schließlich Dr. Marcus Burkhardt von der Universität Siegen in “Open Equals Good?”. Anstatt “Offenheit” als klar definierte Eigenschaft oder Selbstzweck zu akzeptieren, ging Burkhardt den Schritt zurück zur Frage, ob und wie “Offenheit” als Konzept und Ziel von Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft existieren kann.

Im letzten Themenbereich, “Quantifying Literary Theory”, wurden datenanalytische Methoden im Bereich Literatur und Sprache näher dargestellt. Dr. J. Berenike Herrmann von der Universität Basel fasste in ihrem Vortrag “Lovely! Books” erste Resultate eine Studie zusammen, die über eine Million Online-Buchrezensionen von Laienkritiker*innen mit datenanalytischen Methoden auf Vokabular und Wertschätzungen hin untersuchte. Plattformen wie lovelybooks ermöglichen dabei, so Herrmann, eine neue Form ästhetischer und inhaltlicher Literaturkritik durch eine große Menge an Nutzer*innen. Im letzten Vortrag der Tagung ging es um die Schnittstelle zwischen Sprache und Musik: Prof. Mathias Scharinger von der Universität Marburg erklärte, wie das Konzept der “Sprachmelodik” durch neue Methoden der Datenanalyse wissenschaftlich fassbar gemacht werden konnte. Mehr-dimensionale Ansätze ermöglichen neue Erkenntnisse über Ästhetik und Musikalität im menschlichen Sprachgebrauch.

Damit kam die vierte Jahrestagung des Sonderforschungsbereichs “Medien der Kooperation” zum Ende. In 20 Vorträgen hatte sich gezeigt, wie weitreichend das Feld der Datenpraktiken untersucht werden kann, und wie viele Erkenntnisse für die unter-schiedlichsten Fachbereiche sich aus solchen Untersuchungen ergeben können.

17 September 2019
CRC annual conference 2019 with international guests
The CRC "Media of Cooperation" invites international researchers to its fourth annual conference "Data...
CRC annual conference 2019 with international guests

The CRC “Media of Cooperation” invites international researchers to its fourth annual conference “Data Practices: Recorded, Provoked, Invented” from October 24 to 26. The conference addresses the contemporary challenges of praxeological media research in distributed digital infrastructures in six thematic sections. What constitutes a data practice and how are digital media technologies reconfiguring our understanding of practices in general? Autonomously acting media, distributed digital infrastructures and sensor-based media environments challenge the conditions of accounting for data practices both theoretically and empirically. Which forms of cooperation are constituted in, and by, data practices? What are the historical conditions of the possibility of current data practices? And how are human and nonhuman agencies distributed and interrelated in data-saturated environments? These and other questions are explored in a series of interdisciplinary contributions ranging from theoretical and historical reflections over empirical-ethnographic studies to design interventions.

Two keynote lectures by Celia Lury (University of Warwick) and David Ribes (University of Washington, CRC Mercator fellow 2019) will stimulate a broader discussion. Additionally, the first results of a long-term project to digitalize and visually interface the scientific estate of Harold Garfinkel will be presented by Andreas Mertgens and Patrick Sahle.

More informations

11 September 2019
Videos of the conference “Computing is Work! are online
Here you can see the recordings of most contributions of the conference "Computing is Work!", which took...
Videos of the conference “Computing is Work! are online

Here you can see the recordings of most contributions of the conference “Computing is Work!”, which took place in Siegen from July 6th to July 8th, 2017. Keynote speakers at the conference, which was organized by Thomas Haigh and Sebastian Gießmann, included Matthew Jones (Columbia University) and Fred Turner (Stanford).

 

09 August 2019
Publication of the research magazine “future” of the University of Siegen
This year's edition of the research magazine "future" with the main theme "Media of Cooperation" has...
Publication of the research magazine “future” of the University of Siegen

This year’s edition of the research magazine “future” with the main theme “Media of Cooperation” has been published. Included are some contributions by researchers from the SFB “Media of Cooperation”, which deal with the question of how our society has changed through digitally networked media.

17 April 2019
Report on the sixth Money Lab “Infrastructures of Money”
From 7th to 8th March 2019, the sixth MoneyLab "Infrastructures of Money" was organized at the University...
Report on the sixth Money Lab “Infrastructures of Money”

From 7th to 8th March 2019, the sixth MoneyLab “Infrastructures of Money” was organized at the University of Siegen. A short report on the International Cooperation Event with the Institute of Network Cultures (Amsterdam) can be found at http: / /www.uni-siegen.de/start/news/oeffentlichkeit/860836.html

26 March 2019
Imagefilm about the SFB 1187 “Media of Cooperation”
The Department of Press, Marketing and Communication of the University of Siegen has produced an image...
Imagefilm about the SFB 1187 “Media of Cooperation”

The Department of Press, Marketing and Communication of the University of Siegen has produced an image film about the SFB 1187 “Media of Cooperation”. In addition to the speakers Prof. Dr. Tristan Thielmann and Prof. Dr. Carolin Gerlitz the heads and staff of subprojects A06 (“Visual Integrated Clinical Cooperation”), A04 (“Normal Interruptions of Service. Structure and Change of Public Infrastructures”), B05 (“Early Childhood and Smartphone, Familial Interaction Rules, Learning Processes and Cooperation” ) and A05 (“The Cooperative Creation of User Autonomy in the Context of the Ageing Society”) discuss aspects of their ongoing research. The concluding statement comes from William Uricchio, Professor of Comparative Media Studies at MIT in Boston.

08 February 2019
04.02.2019: Abendvortrag – Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht (Stanford)
Sorry, this entry is only available in German.Prof. Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht aus Stanford situierte in seinem...
04.02.2019: Abendvortrag – Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht (Stanford)

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Prof. Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht aus Stanford situierte in seinem Vortrag „Materialität der Kommunikation – Archäologie und Potential eines intellektuellen [akademischen?] Motivs“ am 4. Februar die Forschung des SFB 1187 “Medien der Kooperation” in einer Genealogie des Mediendenkens, die zurück zur Materialität der Kommunikation (1987) und darüber hinaus in die Materialismen des 18. Jahrhunderts führte. Der an der Stanford University lehrende Gumbrecht war in den 1980er-Jahren am Aufbau des ersten DFG-Graduiertenkollegs “Kommunikationsformen als Lebensformen” an der Universität Siegen beteiligt, an dem u.a. Jürgen Habermas, Niklas Luhmann, Jean-Francois Lyotard und Paul Watzlawick zu Gast waren.