Upcoming Events

Mon. 27 June 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Online Event Series „Memory Under Fire“: Russian Disinformation
Read more
27 June 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Russian Disinformation
 
The third event of the “Memory Under Fire” Online Event Series “Russian Disinformation” on June 27th will present research perspectives from Ukrainian scholars and practitioners on Russian disinformation practices and their implications.
We will welcome as guests:
  • Karyna Lazaruk, Visual Communication Specialist and Media Activist Institute of Mass Information Ukraine
  • Marc Tuters, Assistant Professor University of Amsterdam: "Bunk Debunkers: an Empirical Analysis of Russian Participatory War Propaganda on Telegram“
  • Svitlana Matviyenko, Assistant Professor Simon Fraser University: "Communicative Militarism During the Russian War in Ukraine“
  • Maria Haigh, Associate Professor, Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Comenius visiting Professor, University of Siegen, Germany: "Fact-Checking After Truth: StopFake.org fact-checking methods from the Russia Hybrid War on Ukraine, 2014 to 2022“

 

The event series “Memory under Fire” focuses on data and archiving practices in times of war and conflict. With Ukraine as a focal point, we explore the dynamics of information disorder in our platform saturated media sphere. Russia’s full scale invasion of Ukraine has brought innumerable deaths and destruction in the physical sphere, and Russia’s aggression also continues in the digital space, where countless pieces of disinformation, hate speech and propaganda are spread. Additionally, the digital media dynamics of this war have been put front and centre: some call it ‘the first TikTok war’, others argue that Volodimir Zelenskiy and his country invented new ways to fight on the digital battlefield. Russia’s invasion and the ensuing ongoing war highlights both digital warfare and the many data practices that participate in, critique, document, and archive this war.

This current situation sheds light on the need to document and archive war experiences and war crimes for future researchers and generations. This is particularly relevant for both countering disinformation practices and preserving data and access to it digitally, when physical archival infrastructures are being destroyed.

For our event series, we host speakers from the fields of academia and praxis (e.g. Center for Urban History in Lviv, Bellingcat, Mnemonic, University of Amsterdam, Simon Fraser University, Underdog the Unlawyers and other institutions and fields of praxis) to discuss how this war is influenced by and changing our digital media sphere.

The previous first event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Academic Perspectives” on May 23th explored data archiving and creative resistance practices in Ukraine and its diaspora featuring Taras Nazaruk from the Center for Urban History in Lviv and Kateryna Iakovlenko from the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna.
 
The second event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners‘ Perspectives on June 13th focused on archiving war and human rights violations from the critical data practice perspectives in the fields of journalism and NGOs. We hosted Charlotte Godart, investigator and lead of the Global Authentication Project at Bellingcat, Dia Kayyali, Associate Director of Advocacy at Mnemonic, and Olga Lubiv, Analyst at Underdog the Unlawyers, Kyiv, Ukraine.

 

We invite the public to participate in the series of events by registering via migle.bareikyte@uni-siegen.de or yarden.skop@uni-siegen.de for a Zoom link.

Venue

Online
Tue. 28 June 2022 - Tue. 28 June 2022
Information event: Child care at the University of Siegen and possibilities of subsidization
Read more
Tuesday, 28. - 28 June 2022, 12:00 - 13:00
When parents are responsible for a family, the compatibility of work, science, studies and family can only succeed with reliable childcare that meets your needs. The University of Siegen offers numerous childcare options, which we would like to present to you during this event. Using concrete case studies, we will also explain how the University of Siegen's childcare fund can provide financial support in reconciling work and family life and how and under which conditions travel expenses of child(ren) can be refinanced.
 
We kindly ask for a short registration via e-mail to Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de). The event is planned in German, but can be held flexibly in English if required. If you would prefer English, please let us know by 21.06. at the latest. 
 
Childcare for your child(ren) will be provided during the event. 
 
The event will take place in a hybrid setting. We will provide the zoom link beforehand.

The event is a cooperation with the CRC 1472 "Transformation of the Popular" and the Equal Opportunities Office

Venue

Universität Siegen
AH-A 228
Herrengarten 3
Siegen

Contact

Permalink
Wed. 29 June 2022, 2:15 - 4 pm
Lecture Series: "Testing Infrastructures" – Beth Semel (MIT / Language and Technology Lab): “Can You Hear Me Now? Sanity Tests and Screening Difference in Machine Listening for Mental Health Care”
Read more
29 June 2022, 2:15 - 4 pm

Can You Hear Me Now? Sanity Tests and Screening Difference in Machine Listening for Mental Health Care

In the United States, growing numbers of psychiatric and engineering professionals collaborate in attempts to build automated systems that conduct mental health screening based on the sounds of the voice alone. These “vocal biomarker” detection technologies propose to turn any utterance into clinically significant data, regardless of a speaker’s knowledge or interpretations of their psychological status. Dominant discourses surrounding these efforts frame the auditory superiority of artificial intelligence (AI) as key to unlocking a more efficient and equitable future for psychiatric medicine. They often describe AI as a “stethoscope” or “thermometer” for mental illness, implying a straightforwardly biological and quantitative measure detached from the sociocultural and political dimensions of the clinical encounter.

This talk explores the “sanity test”—a computer science term for assessing the desired functionality, i.e. “rationality,” of a model—as an alternative analogy for vocal biomarker systems that more aptly conveys the normative logics, social effects, and matrices of domination embedded within them. Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork with technologists and human test subjects whose sensory practices and voices shape how various vocal biomarker technologies will listen, I show that the boundary between “ill” and “well” bodies and subjects is in constant, contested flux throughout the design process.

 

Dr. Beth Semel is an incoming Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. Her ethnographic research combines linguistic anthropology, science and technology studies, disability studies, and sound studies to explore the sociopolitical life of automated voice analysis, focusing on efforts to integrate these AI-enabled technologies into the U.S. mental health care system. She is currently a postdoctoral associate in Anthropology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she received her PhD in History, Anthropology Science, Technology and Society (HASTS). She is also the co-founder and associate director of the Language and Technology Lab.

 

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

Guests are welcome to register via Mail with 'Send an E-mail'

Venue

Online-Event
Mon. 04 July 2022 - Tue. 05 July 2022
Workshop "Rethinking and Rebuilding: Grand Narratives in the History of Computing"
Read more
Monday, 04. - 05 July 2022

This event is prompted by the publication of A New History of Modern Computing by Thomas Haigh and Paul Ceruzzi (MIT Press, 2021), a book that was planned and largely written under the auspices of Siegen University. As the most ambitious scholarly overview history of computing published this century, this book updates the grand narrative of computing history by drawing on new generations of scholarship. Topics such as digital media devices, videogames, home computing, computer networking, smartphones, cloud computing, and the evolution of the IBM PC standard are integrated into the overall story for the first time.


Yet our purpose here is less to celebrate the new book as to ask what it, and its silences, tell us about the potential to tell other stories on a similar scale about computers and their history. The workshop gathers scholars from fields such as media studies, the history of science and mathematics, and the history of AI to ask what a grand narrative of the history of computing might look like if told from other perspectives. What do Haigh and Ceruzzi get right, and what opportunities did they neglect? What topics and chapters would appear if the story was told in a different way? What would be the protagonists and the plots?

 

Organizers:
Thomas Haigh (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee & Siegen University)
Sebastian Giessmann (Siegen University)

Venue

Room 217/18 of Herrengarten 3, 57072 Siegen and online

Contact

Sebastian Giessmann
giessmann@medienwissenschaft.uni-siegen.de
Permalink
Wed. 06 July 2022, 12 - 2 pm
MGK-Research Colloquium
Read more
06 July 2022, 12 - 2 pm

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Presentation: Yarden Skop

(Dissertation Project: Studying the relationships between platform companies and publishers through the development and deployment of computational tools for content moderation and fact checking)

Discussant: Vesna  Schierbaum

 

1:00 – 2:00pm

Presentation: Clara Fernández de Bobadilla Munoz

(Dissertation Project: Data in crisis: An ethnography of technical practices of/with data during the Covid-19 pandemic)

Discussant: Pip Hare

Wed. 06 July 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm
Research Forum - A02: The Culture of Telecommunication Standardisation in the Tensions of the Digital and Neoliberal ‘Double Revolution & Julia Bee
Read more
06 July 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

A02: The Culture of Telecommunication Standardisation in the Tensions of the Digital and Neoliberal ‘Double Revolution

 

15:15 – 16:15 Uhr

Julia Bee (Universität Siegen)

Bycicle Media and Cooperation

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Tue. 12 July 2022, 12:15 - 1:45 pm
Gender & Diversity Lunch with Dr. Simone Pfeifer
Read more
12 July 2022, 12:15 - 1:45 pm

Gender & Diversity with Dr. Simone Pfeifer (Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz / University of Cologne)

Dr. Simone Pfeifer currently works as a postdoctoral researcher in the DFG Research Training Group 2661: „anschließen-ausschließen - Cultural Dynamics Beyond Globalized Networks“ at the University of Cologne. At the same time she is an associate senior research fellow in the research project “Jihadism on the Internet: Images and Videos, their Appropriation and Dissemination” at the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany. She holds MAs in Social and Cultural Anthropology from the University of Cologne and in Visual Anthropology from the University of Manchester. She completed her PhD at the University of Cologne with a dissertation on the social media practices and transnational everyday lives of Senegalese in Berlin and Dakar. As scientific researcher she was part of the Graduate School "Locating Media".

 

About the series:

The “Gender & Diversity Lunch” series invites all members of the CRC “Media of Cooperation” and “Transformations of the Popular” to an exchange on current topics and issues in the fields of gender equality, diversity and the compatibility of family and science. The goal of the series is to facilitate networking between CRC members and individuals from different fields and with different biographical experiences. A guest on a particular topic is invited to each event. The series is held at lunchtime, including a snack. Suggestions for topics and guests are always welcome.

 

A collaborative format of CRC 1187 & 1472 on equal opportunities

 

Registration via Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de)

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 228
Tue. 12 July 2022, 6 - 7:30 pm
Werkstatt Medienpraxistheorie – "Reappropriating Visual Network Analysis" – Lecture with Mathieu Jacomy (Aalborg University)
Read more
12 July 2022, 6 - 7:30 pm

Lecture: "Reappropriating Visual Network Analysis"

If the noema of big data visualization is “there is an order to that chaos”, then the study of digital traces calls to unveil the hidden structures of digitized society. Visual network analysis seems to promise such powers: complexity unfolding under your eyes! This begs two different kinds of questions. How does it work? But also: is this what we want to do?
Visual network analysis is already reappropriated in various places, like the teaching class and newsroom. As techniques circulate across fields and cultures, network practices change and get shaped in new ways. It is worth discussing different sides to this circulation. Some regrettable, like reusing network maps as marketing assets without containing their narrative powers, and some admirable, like reinventing the methodological commitments of algorithmic techniques inherited from distant fields. We will deconstruct what we see when we look at networks by exposing the gist of visual network analysis and questioning the notion of “community structure”, too often taken for granted. And finally, we will discuss the purpose and design of the apparatus we use to inquire into the complexity of digital traces.

 

Mathieu Jacomy is post-doc at the TANT Lab in Copenhagen, and previously was research engineer at the Sciences Po médialab in Paris. Jacomy tweets at @jacomyma

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 13 July 2022, 10:00 -11:30 am
Werkstatt Medienpraxistheorie – "Network Map Making Workshop" – Workshop with Mathieu Jacomy (Aalborg University)
Read more
13 July 2022, 10:00 -11:30 am

This workshop about visual network analysis is open to all publics, with or without experience with the discipline. We will focus on the mechanics of reading a network map, and from there understand how to build them so that they are useful in practice. The workshop is mostly tool-agnostic, but we will use Gephi, a free network visualization tool, as our tool of choice, for those comfortable with it. We will also address the issue of building a narrative about a network, and how to mobilize the multiple layers of mediation involved, and notably the layout algorithm. Finally, we will engage with (and discuss) Gephisto, an experimental tool designed to produce network maps in one click (but with a catch!). This workshop will make it clear what to expect and not to expect of network maps, how to make them well, how to interpret them properly, and how to approach visual network analysis as an operational practice.

 

Mathieu Jacomy is post-doc at the TANT Lab in Copenhagen, and previously was research engineer at the Sciences Po médialab in Paris. Jacomy tweets at @jacomyma

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 13 July 2022, 2:15 - 3:30 pm
Lecture Series: "Testing Infrastructures" – Anat Ben-David (Open University of Israel): "Testing compliance: Israel‘s repurposing of Secret Services surveillance technologies for Covid-19 Contact Tracing in 2020"
Read more
13 July 2022, 2:15 - 3:30 pm

More information on the talk will follow.

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

Guests are welcome to register via Mail with 'Send an E-mail'

Venue

Room AH-A 217/18 of Herrengarten 3, 57072 Siegen
Wed. 13 July 2022, 3:30 - 5 pm
Lecture Series: “Testing Infrastructures” – Martin Tironi (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile): "Prototyping For More Than Human Futures"
Read more
13 July 2022, 3:30 - 5 pm

"Prototyping For More Than Human Futures"

More information on the talk will follow.

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

Guests are welcome to register via Mail with 'Send an E-mail'

Venue

Online-Event
Thu. 01 September 2022 - Fri. 02 September 2022
Workshop "Agre After Techno-Utopianism"
Read more
Thursday, 01. - 02 September 2022

It is hard to imagine digital culture without the work of Philip E. Agre. His description of the mutual dynamics of digital technology and ideology, so-called ‘grammars of action’ (Agre 1994), and the appeal for a critical technical practice (Agre 1997) have inspired scholars across media studies, HCI, and digital art and design for over 30 years. This workshop, ‘Agre After Techno-Utopianism’, seeks to evaluate his contribution to the study of technology, ideology, critique, and practice since the ‘techno-utopia’ of the early internet era ended, and more dystopic energies emerged.

The relevance of his work today is substantial. In Surveillance and Capture (Agre 1994), Agre saw the threats new workplace technologies posed that would mutate into examples of surveillance capitalism. In Real-Time Politics (Agre 2002), he wrote extensively on the downsides of digital cultures when the web was still considered a techno-utopia. In Pengi (Agre and Chapman 1987), Agre and David Chapman explored critiques of dominant AI conceptualizations. Together, these strands can be considered precursors to work, now commonplace, in software studies and integrated into computational methods for the study of digital culture. In Toward a Critical Technical Practice (Agre 1997), Agre famously offered a synthetic approach to studying technology, straddling the ‘craft work of design’ and the ‘reflexive work of critique’. In High Tech to Human Tech (Agre 1995) the political economy of digital culture became an even greater interest, debunking the ideology of ‘empowerment’ in newly ‘computerized’ workplaces. Even lesser-known work on the Networked University (Agre 2000) offered a prescient insight into the ‘promise and danger’ of remote learning.

Agre’s contribution to, as well as critique of, digital culture was just as significant. He ran the monthly mailing list The Network Observer (TNO) (1994-96) before starting the Red Rock Eater News Service (RRE) (1996-2001), offering regular insights into the ‘social and political aspects of computing and networking’. Not only did Agre critique the emerging digital world, but contributed to the counterculture within it. Since this period, we have experienced the downsides of networks, social media, and platforms, with AI and sensory media accelerating capitalism further. Bringing the founders of the nettime (1995-present) mailing list into conversation with the history of REE we want to think about how list cultures equally manifest as cultures of resistance. In this, we want to re-discover ideas that resisted tech-utopian narratives, and practices that challenged these ideologies.

Collectively, we want to deepen our understanding of Agre’s thinking and the significance of his work. From revisiting well-known texts to rediscovering less-popular work, and exploring the exciting interconnections between various disciplines and forms of ‘net activism’ that engaged with Agre’s work from computational science to sociology, and from work in political economy to across the wider arts and humanities. Within the context of the contemporary platform condition we want to collectively reflect on the relevance, as well as limitations, of his work; continuing to debunk cyber utopias, whilst disassociating and rearticulating narratives of power.

 

CfP for the workshop "Agre After Techno-Utopianism"


For this purpose, we invite contributions to a two-day workshop, 1-2 September 2022 where workshop participants will dive into the work of Agre through different formats: conversations, exegese, and critiques. In this, we are equally interested in exploring his role in shaping digital culture as we are in his academic work.

We invite contributions that engage with Agre's work in a comprehensive manner. We want to develop a foundation for how to read and work with Agre. We especially welcome contributions that seek to apply, and develop, Agre’s key concepts. However, the workshop will also aim to make sense of how Agre's thought has itself developed, from his early experiments with Pengi to the political economy of the internet. How, for instance, did his work on Pengi shape the idea of critical technical practice? What kinds of critique does Interactionism offer for the digital?

While the written contributions are designed to support a thorough examination of Agre's thinking, we will provide ample space for discussion. Here Agre can be confronted with contemporary questions. How, for instance, to think about ‘data practices’, sensor media or automation along with Agre?

Our second concern is to discuss the possibilities and practical implications of a collective inventory or archive of Agre’s work, exploring methods of documenting the network that developed around the RRE in the US and Europe and consider how it might be preserved and/or re-presented. We believe his heterogenous interventions deserve to be organized in a way that is respectful to the media specificity and materiality of early net critique, as well as being made accessible to the broader public.

As the location of the Harold Garfinkel archive, and a pioneer in the study of media practice, ethnomethodology, early internet studies, and the study of infrastructure, SFB1187 Media of Cooperation at the University of Siegen is well suited to host this workshop.

 

Format: 2-day discussion workshop with conversation formats and interviews as well as dedicated discussions of contributions. Papers will be circulated in advance.

Please submit an extended abstract (1000 words)

Deadline for submissions: 10 May 2022

Suggested (non-exhaustive) topics. How did Agre develop critiques around the following issues:

  • Web communities and cultures (mailing lists, social media, tactics, resistance)
  • Connectivity and networks (wired-ness, de/centralization, infrastructure)
  • Capital-isms and technology (surveillance, networked, corporate, managerial)
  • Work and the workplace (tasks, practices, organizational forms)
  • Meaning of work (empowerment, the entrepreneurial self)
  • Surveillance and privacy (grammars of action, capture model)
  • Ethnomethods (accountability, activity, plans)
  • Activity Theory (L. S. Vygotsky) and Interactionism as modes of critique
  • Medium specificity (devices, platforms, AI)
  • Critical Technical Practice (CTP), design and methodology (critique, tech ethics, APIs)
  • Archives and histories (interactivity, accessibility, documentation)
  • Other topics open to ‘Agre-ian’ analysis (e.g. environment, ecology, race)

We welcome contributions from former colleagues and contemporary witnesses. We also hope to hear various personal accounts of these early days of the internet: the ideas, visions, and hopes that shaped, and have been reshaped, by these early developments.

Please send submissions to Tatjana Seitz: tatjana.seitz@uni-siegen.de

 

Organizers: Tatjana Seitz, Sam Hind, Carolin Gerlitz, Sebastian Gießmann

 

Works:

Agre P.E. and Chapman D (1987) Pengi: An implementation of a theory of activity. AAAAI-87 Proceedings 268–272.

Agre P.E. (1994) Surveillance and capture: Two models of privacy. The Information Society: An International Journal 10 (2): 101–127.

Agre P.E. (1995) From high tech to human tech: Empowerment, measurement, and social studies of computing. Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) 3 (1): 167–195.

Agre P.E. (1997) Toward a critical technical practice: Lessons learned in trying to reform AI. In Bowker GC, Leigh Star S, Turner W and Gasser L (eds) Bridging the Great Divide: Social Science, Technical Systems, and Cooperative Work. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 131–158.

Agre P.E. (2000) Infrastructure and institutional change in the networked university. Information, Communication & Society 3 (4): 494–507.

Agre P.E. (2002) Real-Time Politics: The Internet and the Political Process, The Information Society, 18(5), pp. 311–331.

Web resources:

The Network Observer: https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/agre/tno.html

Red Rock Eater News Service (RRE): https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/agre/

 

Venue

Siegen (on site/hybrid)
Thu. 08 September 2022 - Fri. 09 September 2022
Conference "Health Data Practices"
Read more
Thursday, 08. - 09 September 2022

Keynote Speaker, 8 Sept 2022, 11 am: Deborah Lupton

Further information will follow.

Tue. 18 October 2022
Women’s Networking Day: „Spread Your Research“ – Digital self-presentation and visibility in academia
Read more
18 October 2022

Following the motto “Spread Your Research”, the Women's Networking Day 2022 addresses the possibilities of digital self-presentation and visibility in academia.

This year’s Women’s Networking Day is a cooperation of the two Collaborative Research Centers 1472 “Transformations of the Popular” and 1187 “Media of Cooperation”. The idea is to bring early career researchers of all career stages (female students, PhD students and postdocs) of both SFBs into conversation with each other, to open networking opportunities and to provide career-relevant topics and skills.

The program of the one-day event offers lectures and workshops designed by invited experts from different fields, as well as spaces for networking and exchange of experiences. The Women’s Networking Day takes place once a year and has a specific theme. In addition to external experts, university partners and colleagues in positions relevant to the young female researchers are also invited in order to open up “in-house” information and networking opportunities in particular.

Speakers: Susanne Geu (workshop on Twitter), Katja Wolter (workshop on Research Gate & LinkedIn) and others

More detailed information will follow.

Target group: Employees of all status groups of CRC 1187 & 1472

 

A cooperation of CRC 1187 & 1472

 

Sign up here

Mon. 07 November 2022, 10 am - 4 pm
Workshop: „Financial Empowerment: Planning financial independence strategically“ (Dr. Birgit Happel)
Read more
07 November 2022, 10 am - 4 pm

Workshop with Dr. Birgit Happel (geldbiografien.de)
Target group: researchers and employees of CRC 1187 & 1472 

More information will follow.


A cooperation of CRC 1187 & 1472

 

Sign up here

Past Events

Wed. 22 June 2022, 9 - 11 am
Research Tech Lab: "Memespector GUI Hands-On Session" with Jason Chao
Read more
22 June 2022, 9 - 11 am

Research Tech Lab Hands-on Session on Memespector-GUI

Memespector-GUI is a tool to enrich image datasets using computer vision APIs. This hands-on session will guide the participants to obtain access tokens from proprietary APIs, use Memespector-GUI to invoke the APIs and interpret the outputs of the APIs.

For those joining the session, please have a computer running Windows, Mac OS or Linux (with a desktop environment installed) ready with you. Participants may use their own image dataset or a test dataset to be made available during the session.

The session will be delivered in hybrid mode. In-person attendees will benefit from technical assistance on-site, which usually provides more speedy solutions to technical issues.

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 22 June 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm
Research Forum - B06: "Smart Technologies in Domestic Interaction: Consumer Practices and Sustainability between Self-Observation and External Observation" (Working title) | A06: Visual Integrated Clinical Cooperation
Read more
22 June 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

B06: "Smart Technologies in Domestic Interaction: Consumer Practices and Sustainability between Self-Observation and External Observation"(Working title)

 

15:15 - 16:15 Uhr

A06: Visual Integrated Clinical Cooperation

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 22 June 2022, 12 - 2 pm
MGK-Research Colloquium
Read more
22 June 2022, 12 - 2 pm

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Presentation: Vesna Schierbaum

(Dissertation Project: Discursive construction and mediations of the sensory crowd)

Discussant: Fernando van der Vlist

 

1:00 – 2:00pm

Presentation: Fernando van der Vlist

(Dissertation Project: Digital platforms as governing information systems)

Discussant: Clara Ferná ndez de Bobadilla Munoz

Tue. 21 June 2022, 12:15 - 1:45 pm
Gender & Diversity Lunch with Prof. Dr. Julia Bee
Read more
21 June 2022, 12:15 - 1:45 pm

Gender & Diversity Lunch with Prof. Dr. Julia Bee

Prof. Dr. Julia Bee is professor for media aesthetic at the University of Siegen and got her PhD with a dissertation titled "Zuschauer_innen-Gefüge. Begehren, Differenz und Macht in Film- und Fernsehwahrnehmung". Her research focuses on gender and media, image as research media, artistic research, visual anthropology, postcolonial theory, bicycle culture and mobility among others. Julia Bee will talk about her career and her path to becoming a junior professor and professor. Together we will discuss career opportunities within the university as well as the precarity, chances and challenges of careers in academia.

 

About the series:

The “Gender & Diversity Lunch” series invites all members of the CRC “Media of Cooperation” and “Transformations of the Popular” to an exchange on current topics and issues in the fields of gender equality, diversity and the compatibility of family and science. The goal of the series is to facilitate networking between CRC members and individuals from different fields and with different biographical experiences. A guest on a particular topic is invited to each event. The series is held at lunchtime, including a snack. Suggestions for topics and guests are always welcome.

 

A collaborative format of CRC 1187 & 1472 on equal opportunities

 

Registration via Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de)

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 228
Wed. 15 June 2022, 2:15 - 4 pm
Lecture Series: "Testing Infrastructures" – Franziska Engels (Policy Lab Digital Work and Society): "Test Beds as Instruments of Innovation Governance"
Read more
15 June 2022, 2:15 - 4 pm

"Test beds as instruments of innovation governance"

Test beds have emerged as a prominent policy instrument to foster innovation across geographical regions and technical domains. Although its popularity and proliferation, research has so far widely dismissed the co-productionist character of this test bed's experimental approach to innovation. Test beds as spatially confined, purposeful experimental settings aim at once to test, demonstrate, and advance the viability of new sociotechnical arrangements. Basing on my doctoral research, I will present a definition of test beds and an analytic framework for this distinctive approach to innovation - both on the level of technological development and the policy level. Drawing on in-depth empirical analysis from two case studies, I will show how test bed innovation unfolds along three characteristic tensions: (1) an oscillation between controlled experimentation and messy co-creation processes, (2) a dual logic of quasi-scientific testing and public demonstration, (3) an emphasis on place and spatial delineation versus an inherent promise of scalability and generalizability for a future society at large. Test beds reconfigure and "test" society around a new set of technologies and associated modes of governance based on particular visions of the future. In this talk I also raise questions of a responsible use and governance of test beds and experimentation as approaches of policymaking.


Franziska Engels is a policy advisor at the Policy Lab Digital Work and Society at the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs since 2022. Before that, she was working for the German High-Tech Forum that has advised the former Government on implementing its research and innovation strategy (High-Tech Strategy 2025). Prior to her work in politics, she was a research fellow at the Berlin Social Science Center (WZB), the TU Berlin, and a visiting researcher at UC Berkeley. She holds a doctorate degree in innovation policy from TU Munich (Munich Center for Technology and Society) and a Master’s degree in Social Science from Humboldt-University Berlin.

On the Lecture Series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?

 

Guests are welcome to register via Mail with 'Send an E-mail'

Venue

Room AH-A 217/18 of Herrengarten 3, 57072 Siegen
Mon. 13 June 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Online Event Series „Memory Under Fire“: Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners’ Perspectives
Read more
13 June 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners’ Perspectives
 
The second event of the “Memory Under Fire” Online Event Series “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners‘ Perspectives” on June 13th  focuses on archiving war and human rights violations from the critical data practice perspectives in the fields of journalism and NGOs.
We will host:
  • Charlotte Godart, investigator and lead of the Global Authentication Project at Bellingcat: “Mapping Incidents of Civilian Harm in Ukraine”
  • Dia Kayyali, Associate Director of Advocacy at Mnemonic: “Social Media as Makeshift Archives of Human Rights Documentation: Content Moderation Issues and Beyond”
  • Olga Lubiv, Analyst at Underdog the Unlawyers, Kyiv, Ukraine: “Practical Aspects of Collecting and Utilising Data on Russian Soldiers and International Business in Russia Related to Russian War in Ukraine 2022”

Memory under Fire” focuses on data and archiving practices in times of war and conflict. With Ukraine as a focal point, we explore the dynamics of information disorder in our platform saturated media sphere. Russia’s full scale invasion of Ukraine has brought innumerable deaths and destruction in the physical sphere, and Russia’s aggression also continues in the digital space, where countless pieces of disinformation, hate speech and propaganda are spread. Additionally, the digital media dynamics of this war have been put front and centre: some call it ‘the first TikTok war’, others argue that Volodimir Zelenskiy and his country invented new ways to fight on the digital battlefield. Russia’s invasion and the ensuing ongoing war highlights both digital warfare and the many data practices that participate in, critique, document, and archive this war.

This current situation sheds light on the need to document and archive war experiences and war crimes for future researchers and generations. This is particularly relevant for both countering disinformation practices and preserving data and access to it digitally, when physical archival infrastructures are being destroyed.

For our event series, we host speakers from the fields of academia and praxis (e.g. Center for Urban History in Lviv, Bellingcat, Mnemonic, University of Amsterdam, Simon Fraser University, Underdog the Unlawyers and other institutions and fields of praxis) to discuss how this war is influenced by and changing our digital media sphere.

The Previous first event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Academic Perspectives” on May 23th explored data archiving and creative resistance practices in Ukraine and its diaspora featuring Taras Nazaruk from the Center for Urban History in Lviv and Kateryna Iakovlenko from the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna.

The third event „Russian Disinformation“ on June 27th will present research perspectives from Ukrainian scholars and practitioners on Russian disinformation practices and their implications. We will welcome as guests: Karyna Lazaruk, Visual Communication Specialist and Media Activist, Institute of Mass Information, Ukraine, and Marc Tuters, Assistant Professor, University of Amsterdam, Svitlana Matviyenko, Assistant Professor, Simon Fraser University and Oleksiy Radynski, Filmmaker and Writer.

 

We invite the public to participate in the series of events by registering via migle.bareikyte@uni-siegen.de or yarden.skop@uni-siegen.de for a Zoom link.

Venue

Online
Fri. 03 June 2022, 9 - 1 pm
Workshop: "Critical Whiteness – Perspectives and Positioning for Everyday University Life" (with KARFI)
Read more
03 June 2022, 9 - 1 pm

Critical Whiteness – Perspectives and Positioning for Everyday University Life

University is not a neutral space but should be particularly committed to a critical engagement with social injustices. Since attacks on Black people, people of Color, Jewish people, people with a migration and/or refugee history in Germany are even in 2022 not at all unusual, critical perspectives on racism are needed in all teaching and learning contexts.

How to deal with racist remarks made by colleagues, teachers, students, or friends? What options regarding racism-critical academic work and learning do I have?

This workshop aims to address different mechanisms of racism, especially concerning an academic environment, to provide space to put individual experiences with racism into context. For further discussion, Critical Whiteness as a concept, attitude and position will be introduced and worked with.

Even though this workshop is conceptualized as an introduction, it is thought to offer many points of connection to persons who are in different stage of their anti-racist development/ who already have experience in antiracist work.

For a part of this workshop, separate spaces will be offered by the speakers to provide room for exchange for participants with personal experiences of racial discrimination (Black persons and persons of Color who are not considered white and German) and participants with experiences of discrimination due to their biography of (family) migration.

 

KARFI – Black Collective for Empowerment and Racism-Critical Education

“Empowerment against and raising awareness on racism is how the work of KARFI can be described best. As an association of three Black women, the educational collective offers workshops, lectures, and process support on living and working critically of racism. KARFI combines perspectives from counseling and educational practice, critical social sciences, and Black political activism.”

 

Texts:

Nadine Golly, Ilinda Bendler (2021): „Empowerment. Selbstermächtigung. Ein politisches und emanzipatives Konzept zur Schaffung eigener Räume und Narrative.“ In: Karim Fereidooni / Stefan E. Hößl (Hg.): Rassismuskritische Bildungsarbeit. Reflexionen zu Theorie und Praxis. Wochenschau Verlag.

Ilinda Bendler, Laura Digoh-Ersoy, Nadine Golly (2019): „Wechselnde Allianzen - rassismuskritische Bildungsarbeit in einem Schwarzen Bündnis.“ In: Jule Bönkost (Hg.): Unteilbar. Bündnisse gegen Rassismus. Unrast Verlag.

 

Registration via Juliane Biewald (juliane.biewald@student.uni-siegen.de)

Venue

Online
Wed. 01 June 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm
Research Forum - Sam Hind/Max Kanderske & Petra Missomelius
Read more
01 June 2022, 2:15 - 4:15 pm

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

Sam Hind/Max Kanderske (Universität Siegen)

Re-Routing Logistics

 

15:15 - 16:15 Uhr

Petra Missomelius (Universität Innsbruck)

Orientierende Bewegungen im Innen und Außen: Denkbewegungen in medialen Konfigurationen des Lesens und Schreibens

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 01 June 2022, 12 - 2 pm
MGK-Research Colloquium
Read more
01 June 2022, 12 - 2 pm

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Presentation: Sarah Rüller

(Dissertation Project: Being public under increasing and diminishing Infrastructures: Understanding Media Practices and Sense-Making of Technology in non-urban Areas in Palestine and Morocco)

Discussant: Susanne Förster

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Presentation: Sheree May Saßmannshausen

(Dissertation Project: Intermediary, multimodal and immersive infrastructures for digital citizen participation in urban and regional planning)

Discussant: Niklas Strüver

Wed. 25 May 2022, 3:15 - 5:15 pm
Lecture Series: "Testing Infrastructures" – Noortje Marres (University of Warwick) & Philippe Sormani (Universität Siegen): "Testing ‘AI’: A Conversation"
Read more
25 May 2022, 3:15 - 5:15 pm
Testing 'AI': Do we have a situation?
 
A conversation between Noortje Marres and Philippe Sormani
 
Proponents of the 'new' AI, in the shape of very large deep learning models, have claimed that these systems exhibit radically new capacities for judgement and decision-making (for a discussion, see Roberge and Castelle, 2021; see also Suchman, 2002). Tests and demos, such as AlphaGo's victory at the Four Seasons Hotel in Seoul, South Korea (Sormani, 2018; Mair et al, 2021) and street trials of self-driving vehicles in the UK (Marres, 2020), have played a notable role in the propagation, as well as the problematisation, of such claims. In this conversation, Noortje Marres and Philippe Sormani discuss how social studies of technology are to approach and engage with these phenomena. 
 
The conversation will be structured around the following questions: What can we learn from today's real-world testing of "AI" regarding the distribution of capacities between artefacts, environment and context in compute-intensive practices (Quéré & Schoch, 1998)? Does the performance and evaluation of "machine intelligence" continue to demand the erasure of situations and the bracketing of social life? What does this tell us about possible tensions and alignments between different "definitions of the situation" assumed in social studies, engineering and computer science? (To riff on Star (1999)'s dictum: "one person's situation may be another person's barrier.") Does it make sense for social studies of technology to rely on the observation of situations in the re-specification of machine intelligence?
 

On the lecture series: "Testing Infrastructures"

From QR codes used to verify COVID-19 vaccination status’ to cloud software used to train machine learning models, infrastructures of testing are proliferating. Whilst the infrastructures themselves come in different forms - from ‘off the shelf’ systems to tailor-made technologies - they all have a capacity to generate specific ‘test situations’ involving an array of different actors from ‘ghost’ workers to python scripts. An increasing reliance on digital platforms, protocols, tools, and procedures has led to a redistribution of testing itself: not just where testing takes place, and who performs the testing, but who has access to, and control over, mechanisms for testing, test protocols and of course, test results. In this lecture series, we focus on the practices making up the test infrastructures and explore different perspectives to make sense of the realities enacted by testing.

We invite our lecture guests to ask: how do testing infrastructures engender the construction of specific testing routines and practices? What kinds of affective experiences, reactions, and responses are generated through testing? Here we invite reflection on how testing infrastructures oft fade into the background, pointing to a tapestry of maintenance and repair practices. Lastly, what are the ways in which we can evaluate the role of digital infrastructures more broadly? This includes the challenge of what novel test methods can be developed and actually ‘tested’ to gain a better understanding of how infrastructures work. Our exploration of test practices in this context is interwoven with the search for test media that bind actors together or create barriers; that enable cooperation or declare it impossible.

Possible questions include (but are not limited to):

  • What are the implications of testing in different social situations and in what moments do they come to the fore? 
  • When and where are tests conducted—for whom and what, through whom and what, and by whom and what actors?
  • What are digital practices for/of testing and with what types of data do testing infrastructures support?
  • What other practices spawn from distributed testing? Think of practices of passing and obfuscation within nested situations of testing and the outsourcing of ‘validation work’ as constructions that govern.
  • What methodological strategies are there to make test procedures and their foundations transparent?
  • Can different politics of testing be distinguished? If so, where and under what conditions?
  • Can we demarcate between embodied testing and disembodied testing?
 
References:
Mair, M., Brooker, P., Dutton, W., & Sormani, P. (2021). Just what are we doing when we’re describing AI? Harvey Sacks, the commentator machine, and the descriptive politics of the new artificial intelligence. Qualitative Research, 21(3), 341-359.
 
Marres, N. (2020). Coexistence or displacement: Do street trials of intelligent vehicles test society?. The British journal of sociology, 71(3), 537-555.
 
Roberge, J., & Castelle, M. (2021). Toward an End-to-End Sociology of 21st-Century Machine Learning. In The Cultural Life of Machine Learning (pp. 1-29). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.
 
Quéré, L., & Schoch, C. (1998). The still-neglected situation?. Réseaux: The French journal of communication, Communication-Technologie-Société, 6(2), 223-253.
 
Sormani, P. (2018, June). Logic-in-Action? AlphaGo, Surprise Move 37 and Interaction Analysis. In Handbook of the 6th World Congress and School on Universal Logic (p. 378).
 
Star, S. L. (1999). The ethnography of infrastructure. American behavioral scientist, 43(3), 377-391.
 
Suchman, L. (2008). Feminist STS and the Sciences of the Artificial. The handbook of science and technology studies, 3, 139-164.
 

Venue

Online-Event
Wed. 25 May 2022, 2:15 - 3:15 pm
Research Forum - B05: Early childhood and smartphone. Family interaction order, learning processes and cooperation & Noortje Marres & Philippe Sormani
Read more
25 May 2022, 2:15 - 3:15 pm

14:15 - 15:15 Uhr

B05: Early childhood and smartphone. Family interaction order, learning processes and cooperation

 

15:15 – 16:15 Uhr

Noortje Marres & Philippe Sormani: Testing ‘AI’: A Conversation (via Zoom)

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18
Wed. 25 May 2022, 12 - 2 pm
MGK-Research Colloquium
Read more
25 May 2022, 12 - 2 pm

12:00 – 1:00 pm

Presentation: Susanne Förster

(Dissertation Project: Agentic Media: Formations of Semi-Autonomy)

Discussant: Yarden Skop

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Presentation: Niklas Strüver

(Dissertation Project: Voice Assistants as sociotechnical phenomena: About infrastructures and platforms)

Discussant: Tim Hector

Mon. 23 May 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Online Event Series „Memory Under Fire“: Archiving Under Fire: Adacemic Perspectives
Read more
23 May 2022, 4 - 6 pm
Archiving in Times of Crisis: Academic Perspectives
 
The first event "Archiving in Times of Crisis: Academic Perspectives," will explore data archiving and creative resistance practices in Ukraine and its diaspora. We will host Taras Nazaruk from the Center for Urban History in Lviv and Kateryna Iakovlenko from the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna. Taras will present the digital dimension of the war in Ukraine and the complex practice of archiving war-related information flows on Telegram a go-to app for millions of Ukrainians. Kateryna will discuss various strategies of data practices and digital resistance by Ukrainian artists and activists addressing critical issues such as ethics censorship and equality with a focus on self-organised initiatives.

The event series “Memory under Fire” focuses on data and archiving practices in times of war and conflict. With Ukraine as a focal point, we explore the dynamics of information disorder in our platform saturated media sphere. Russia’s full scale invasion of Ukraine has brought innumerable deaths and destruction in the physical sphere, and Russia’s aggression also continues in the digital space, where countless pieces of disinformation, hate speech and propaganda are spread. Additionally, the digital media dynamics of this war have been put front and centre: some call it ‘the first TikTok war’, others argue that Volodimir Zelenskiy and his country invented new ways to fight on the digital battlefield. Russia’s invasion and the ensuing ongoing war highlights both digital warfare and the many data practices that participate in, critique, document, and archive this war.

This current situation sheds light on the need to document and archive war experiences and war crimes for future researchers and generations. This is particularly relevant for both countering disinformation practices and preserving data and access to it digitally, when physical archival infrastructures are being destroyed.

For our event series, we host speakers from the fields of academia and praxis (e.g. Center for Urban History in Lviv, Bellingcat, Mnemonic, University of Amsterdam, Simon Fraser University, Underdog the Unlawyers and other institutions and fields of praxis) to discuss how this war is influenced by and changing our digital media sphere.

The second event “Archiving in Times of Crisis: Practitioners‘ Perspectives on June 13th focuses on archiving war and human rights violations from the critical data practice perspectives in the fields of journalism and NGOs. We will host Charlotte Godart, investigator and lead of the Global Authentication Project at Bellingcat, Dia Kayyali, Associate Director of Advocacy at Mnemonic, and Olga Lubiv, Analyst at Underdog the Unlawyers, Kyiv, Ukraine.

 

We invite the public to participate in the series of events by registering via migle.bareikyte@uni-siegen.de or yarden.skop@uni-siegen.de for a Zoom link.

 

Venue

Online
Wed. 18 May 2022, 12 - 2 pm
Research Tech Lab: "Metadata Components for Qualitative and Ethnographic Data"
Read more
18 May 2022, 12 - 2 pm

with Aynalem Misganaw and Gaia Mosconi

Venue

Herrengarten 3, AH-A 217/18 (hybrid session)
Mon. 16 May 2022, 12 - 4 pm
Workshop "I am a Mentor! Part 2 – Reflecting Mentoring Experiences" -cancelled-
Read more
16 May 2022, 12 - 4 pm

Within the framework of the mentoring program of our CRC, we want to enable our members and especially the mentors of the program to expand their mentoring skills. In the second workshop “I am a Mentor! Part 2 – Reflecting Mentoring Experiences” the participants will build on what they learned in part 1 and reflect their mentoring experiences since then.

The booster workshop aims to reflect with the mentors upon their established mentoring partnerships. We talk about the challenges and successes experienced in the matching process. The mentors are encouraged to exchange experiences about the common topics, difficulties and positive aspects within the established mentoring partnerships. Mentors are motivated to reflect on their own experiences and to give collegial feedback. Additionally, we will discuss helpful tools to have a successful mentoring partnership over the coming months.

 

The workshop will be held online and in English.

For the workshop a registration in advance is required. It is also possible to join the workshop, if you couldn't partake in part 1.

 

Katja Wolter is a DSGv-certified trainer and mentor at the Steinbeis Research Center Institute for Resource Development who has specialized in scientific coaching.

Venue

Online-Event

You can find past events in our Archive!