Upcoming Events

Wed. 02 December 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Helen Kennedy (University of Sheffield): "What do we know about what people think about data practices?"
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Lecture Series”Interrogating Data Practices” – Helen Kennedy (University of Sheffield): “What do we know about what people think about data practices?”
02 December 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

 

Five years ago, not much ‘bottom up’ empirical research into people’s thoughts, feelings and experiences of datafication had been undertaken. But a lot has changed in a short time, and recent years have seen a proliferation of surveys, polls and qualitative research about such matters. Drawing on a comprehensive review of academic and grey literature on this topic, I will comment on some emergent themes and identify future directions for research in this area. These include: the affective dimensions of living data; whether more trust in datafication should be the goal; ideas about fairness; the importance of social inequalities and their absence in much of this research; and how the way that research is undertaken shapes what is found.

Wed. 09 December 2020, 18:00-19:00
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices""Interrogating Data Practices" - Philipp Goll (Universität Siegen): "Uwe Nettelbecks Fantômas. Eine Sittengeschichte des Erkennungsdienstes (1979)"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices””Interrogating Data Practices” – Philipp Goll (Universität Siegen): “Uwe Nettelbecks Fantômas. Eine Sittengeschichte des Erkennungsdienstes (1979)”
09 December 2020, 18:00-19:00

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

Uwe Nettelbecks Fantômas. Eine Sittengeschichte des Erkennungsdienstes (1979) wurde im Jahrzehnt der Politik der Inneren Sicherheit in der Bundesrepublik publiziert. Fantômas. Eine Sittengeschichte des Erkennungsdienstes erschien in schwarzes Leinen gehüllt, mit schwarzem Farbschnitt und in einem schwarzem Schuber. Das Buch dreht sich um die Geschichte und Gegenwart der Kriminalistik. Im Mittelpunkt der knapp tausendseitigen literarischen Montage steht die Vision des BKA-Chefs Horst Herold, sein Entwurf einer EDV-gestützten Verbrechensbekämpfung, deren „Datensammelwut“ Bürgerrechtlern der 1970er Jahre Albträume bescherte. Uwe Nettelbecks Fantômas. Eine Sittengeschichte des Erkennungsdienstes fällt trotz dieser Aktualität bis heute durchs Raster der Literaturgeschichte

Wed. 09 December 2020, 03:00-05:00 pm
MGK-Colloquium
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MGK-Colloquium
09 December 2020, 03:00-05:00 pm

Presentation: Lara Saadi, Aikaterini Mniestri

Due to the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the colloquium will be held online until further notice. For further information or registration please contact Tobias Conradi.

Tue. 15 December 2020, 04:00-5:30 pm
Research Tech Lab - Session 2: "YouTube Data Tools" - with Aikaterini Mniestri and Marcus Burkhardt
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Research Tech Lab – Session 2: “YouTube Data Tools” – with Aikaterini Mniestri and Marcus Burkhardt
15 December 2020, 04:00-5:30 pm
Wed. 16 December 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Catherine D’Ignazio (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): "Data Feminism"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Catherine D’Ignazio (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): “Data Feminism”
16 December 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

 

As data are increasingly mobilized in the service of governments and corporations, their unequal conditions of production, their asymmetrical methods of application, and their unequal effects on both individuals and groups have become increasingly difficult for data scientists--and others who rely on data in their work--to ignore. But it is precisely this power that makes it worth asking: "Data science by whom? Data science for whom? Data science with whose interests in mind? These are some of the questions that emerge from what we call data feminism, a way of thinking about data science and its communication that is informed by the past several decades of intersectional feminist activism and critical thought. Illustrating data feminism in action, this talk will show how challenges to the male/female binary can help to challenge other hierarchical (and empirically wrong) classification systems; it will explain how an understanding of emotion can expand our ideas about effective data visualization; how the concept of invisible labor can expose the significant human efforts required by our automated systems; and why the data never, ever “speak for themselves.” The goal of this talk, as with the project of data feminism, is to model how scholarship can be transformed into action: how feminist thinking can be operationalized in order to imagine more ethical and equitable data practices.

Wed. 16 December 2020, 05:00-06:00 pm
CRC Research Forum
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CRC Research Forum
16 December 2020, 05:00-06:00 pm
Wed. 06 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Julia Kurz/Dmitri Presnov (Universität Siegen): "Widerständige Muskeln auf dem Prüfstand. Medizinische, soziologische und informatische Datenpraktiken im Vergleich"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Julia Kurz/Dmitri Presnov (Universität Siegen): “Widerständige Muskeln auf dem Prüfstand. Medizinische, soziologische und informatische Datenpraktiken im Vergleich”
06 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email
Wed. 06 January 2021, 03:00-05:00 pm
MGK-Colloquium
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MGK-Colloquium
06 January 2021, 03:00-05:00 pm

Presentation: Max Kanderske, Misganaw Aynalem Tesfaye

Due to the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the colloquium will be held online until further notice. For further information or registration please contact Tobias Conradi.

Thu. 07 January 2021, 12:00 AM - 02:00 PM
Workshop-Series on Gender-Equality and Work-Life-Balance - Antje Rach: "Networks and Support-Systems"
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Workshop-Series on Gender-Equality and Work-Life-Balance – Antje Rach: “Networks and Support-Systems”
07 January 2021, 12:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Language of the Workshop: German/tba

Tue. 12 January 2021, 04:00-5:30 pm
Research Tech Lab - Session 3: "Digital Methods for App Studies" - with Fernando van der Vlist
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Research Tech Lab – Session 3: “Digital Methods for App Studies” – with Fernando van der Vlist
12 January 2021, 04:00-5:30 pm
Wed. 13 January 2021, 05:00-06:00 pm
CRC Research Forum
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CRC Research Forum
13 January 2021, 05:00-06:00 pm
Wed. 13 January 2021, 18:00-19:00
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Hilmar Schäfer (Humboldt University of Berlin): "Datenpraktiken - vom Digitalwerden der Praxis"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Hilmar Schäfer (Humboldt University of Berlin): “Datenpraktiken – vom Digitalwerden der Praxis”
13 January 2021, 18:00-19:00

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

Wed. 20 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Tim Hector/Christine Hrncal/David Waldecker (University of Siegen): "Un/erbetene Beobachtung in Interaktion – Datenpraktiken in der Smart-Speaker-Nutzung"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Tim Hector/Christine Hrncal/David Waldecker (Universität Siegen): “Un/erbetene Beobachtung in Interaktion – Datenpraktiken in der Smart-Speaker-Nutzung”
20 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

 

Wed. 20 January 2021, 03:00-05:00 pm
MGK-Colloquium
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MGK-Colloquium
20 January 2021, 03:00-05:00 pm

Presentation: Niklas Strüver, Hoa Mai Trần

Due to the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the colloquium will be held online until further notice. For further information or registration please contact Tobias Conradi.

Wed. 27 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Christian Henrich-Franke (University of Siegen): "Problemfelder der Verschmelzung von IT und Telekommunikation in den 1970er/80er Jahren"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Christian Henrich-Franke (University of Siegen): “Problemfelder der Verschmelzung von IT und Telekommunikation in den 1970er/80er Jahren”
27 January 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

Die Verschmelzung von IT und Telekommunikation in digitalen Datennetzen brachte Technologien, Unternehmen, (inter-) nationale Organisationen und Regulierungsansätze miteinander in Berührung, die zuvor voneinander unabhängige Entwicklungen genommen hatten. Sie führte deshalb auch zu substanziellen Neujustierungen von Ordnungspolitiken, Unternehmenspolitiken oder (inter-) nationalen Regulierung- und Standardisierungsbemühungen, die nicht immer problemlos verliefen. Der Vortrag nimmt diese Probleme und Problemfelder in den Blick und fragt exemplarisch nach Entwicklungsbrüchen und deren Konsequenzen.

Wed. 03 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Hannah Knox (University College London): "Practice of Futuring: Reckoning with Climate Data"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Hannah Knox (University College London): “Practice of Futuring: Reckoning with Climate Data”
03 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email
 

In this talk I turn attention to the 'data practice' of predictive analytics, to explore how predictive climate models work to demarcate futures and with what effects. A crucial aspect of the allure of contemporary data is its capacity to create a picture of the future – whether of the economy, consumption behaviour or the climate. But the future that modelled predictions generate are not straightforward. Located in computational networks, such futures are not simply the plans, imaginaries or indeed practices of ideologues or engineers but the effects of an autopoetic unfolding from contingent material inputs that render traces of the present into plausible stories of what might happen. These futures are neither fictions nor realities, but sit somewhere between the two, describing what is to come whilst also undoing themselves in their injunction to change the present with a view to altering the trajectories that they imagine. 
 
While anthropologists have developed a sophisticated vocabulary for talking about the past (tradition, genealogy, inheritance, myth, totem) and the present (culture, relationality, kinship, exchange), we have a less developed set of conceptual resources for understanding the futures of predictive analytics, or participating in the reimagination of their form. Our current methods (oral history, archival research, ethnography, practice-focused research) are arguably ill-equipped to address the implications of futurities produced by computational models. How then might we gain a better handle on the futures that predictive analytics are generating? And how might this help us, as critical scholars, to participate more effectively in redirecting the now often apocalyptic trajectories revealed by data science? 

 
 

 
 

Tue. 09 February 2021, 04:00-5:30 pm
Research Tech Lab - Session 4: "Sensor-based Digital Methods: Studying App Traffic" - with Jason Chao
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Research Tech Lab – Session 4: “Sensor-based Digital Methods: Studying App Traffic” – with Jason Chao
09 February 2021, 04:00-5:30 pm
Wed. 10 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Christian Meier zu Verl (University of Konstanz): "Descriptions, Chains of Media, and the Threshold of Meaning"
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Lecture Series “Interrogating Data Practices” – Christian Meier zu Verl (University of Konstanz): “Descriptions, Chains of Media, and the Threshold of Meaning”
10 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

Thu. 11 February 2021, 02:00-04:00 pm
Workshop-Series on Gender-Equality and Work-Life-Balance - Wiebke Deimann: "Scientific Career and Parenthood"
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Workshop-Series on Gender-Equality and Work-Life-Balance – Wiebke Deimann: “Scientific Career and Parenthood”
11 February 2021, 02:00-04:00 pm

Language: German/English

Thu. 29 April 2021 - Fri. 30 April 2021
International Virtual Workshop: "Deixis and Indexicality”
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International Virtual Workshop: “Deixis and Indexicality”
Thursday, 29. - 30 April 2021

[more information to follow]

Wed. 05 May 2021 - Sat. 08 May 2021
"Geomedia 2021 – Off the Grid": The 4th International Geomedia Conference
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“Geomedia 2021 – Off the Grid”: The 4th International Geomedia Conference
Wednesday, 05. - 08 May 2021 Organized Locating Media | Media of Cooperation

The phrase “off the grid” is commonly understood to refer to the voluntary decoupling from established infrastructure networks such as electricity, water or gas supply. The implication is one of material independence and a self-sufficient lifestyle. Going “off the grid” means making yourself invisible by rebuking the social and technological structures that normally organize our lives. It is entering, or returning to, uncharted territory. The grid from which you disappear is often imagined like a web that we are woven into, at once providing security – of cultural connectivity, opportunities to work, or societal participation – while also limiting individual, political or technological agency.

The grid also speaks to the geographic coordinate system, an all-encompassing global structure which makes it possible to accurately locate any point on earth. This unified grid represents a dominant ordering principle for everything “locatable”. It is part of the technological infrastructure of many platforms, services and applications which fall under the definition of geomedia, most prominently the Global Positioning System (GPS). In this regard, “off the grid” is a move away from such Cartesian notions of space towards a situated relational account of (quotidian) practices carried out with, through, or in relation to, geomedia.

Going off the grid has also been seen as a form of renunciation of the conveniences of the late capitalist (media) world in order to lead a supposedly slower, less stressful and eventually less superficial life – as inspired by the transcendentalism of the likes of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson. But with so many people relying on the grid for purposes of work and entertainment in recent times, what does this mean for our relation to geomedia? What does going off the grid look like now? This presupposes, of course, that there is ipso facto a grid – an infrastructure – which one can connect to freely at any time. But a great number of people do not get to choose to decouple from the grid – a fact that speaks to questions of access to the socio-material infrastructures underpinning geomedia and associated communities and practices.

Arguably, practices of surveillance and countersurveillance concern the implicit or even involuntary participation in corresponding infrastructures. Here, optimization for a range of tasks and activities routinely involves a certain kind of surveillance; a default setting in the running of all kinds of media platforms used for navigation, video streaming or online gaming. In this, surveillance is wrapped up with profit-seeking practices, and the extraction of value from the ‘data fumes’ of platform users, who enter a form of “cooperation without consensus” as they stream movies, hire taxis, host videoconferences, ride public transport, or go on dates. In these various iterations, surveillance might look different, and/or be practiced in distinct ways to traditional forms of state or corporate surveillance, increasingly dependent on technological protocols and standards that not only underpin the grid but also govern our use of geomedia. One consequence is that the relation between private and public spheres is transformed, and introduces new questions of governance, exploitation and marginalization. It is of crucial importance, who is online, and who is offline might as well not exist. Yet these optimization processes are also subject to countermeasures that constitute new modes of existence - from anonymous accounts and the use of VPNs, to location spoofing, and other tricks and techniques to hide, erase, or obfuscate user activity and location.

Yet the grid is not all-encompassing, nor all-powerful. Whilst countersurveillance efforts resist, fight back and oppose, alternative geomedia projects imagine the grid differently – sometimes even plotting its demise. From community broadband initiatives, to independent media organizations, post-capitalist streaming platforms, and citizen science projects; there is a continued, concerted effort to build alternatives to state-based, or company-owned geomedia, operating at various scales from the hyperlocal to the global. Through these efforts, organizers and participants question the foundations of our collective social and technological infrastructures, redefining what it is to care, share, distribute, cultivate or reallocate funds, resources, opportunities and ideas – bringing new geomedia, and new imaginaries of hope (or perhaps fear), into existence.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Caren Kaplan – University of California at Davis, USA
  • Nanna Verhoeff – Utrecht University, Netherlands

Suggested paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Politics, philosophy and ethics of going off grid
  • Grid as Network, Grid as Default (Geomedia and Infrastructure)
  • Physical Geography/Relational Geography
  • Inhabiting Digital Geographies (VR, hybrid spaces)
  • Geomedia in the Global South
  • Urban and Rural Geomedia
  • The ‘geo’ in Geomedia, the ‘media’ in Geomedia
  • Governing Geomedia (smart city, sensor media, infrastructures, surveillance & countersurveillance)
  • Geomedia Activism
  • Digital detox, rationing, quarantine and isolation
  • Geomedia Histories

Geomedia 2021 welcomes proposals for individual papers as well as thematic panels in English.

Individual paper proposals: The author submits an abstract of 200–250 words. Accepted papers are grouped by the organizers into sessions of 5 papers according to thematic area.

Thematic panel proposals: The chair of the panel submits a proposal consisting of 4–5 individual paper abstracts (200-250 words) along with a general panel presentation of 200–250 words.

Conference timeline:

  • October 31st 2020: Submission system opens
  • January 7th 2021: Deadline for thematic panel and individual paper proposals
  • January 25th 2021: Notes of acceptance and registration opens
  • March 15th 2021: Last day of registration

Conference website:

Information about registration, conference programme, venue, social events and practical arrangements will be posted continuously on the conference website starting September 1st:
www.geomediastudies.com.

Contact: You can reach us at info@geomediastudies.com.

Organizers and venue:

Geomedia 2021 is hosted by the Graduate School “Locating Media” and the CRC “Media of Cooperation” at the Department of Media Research, Siegen University, Siegen. The venue is situated east of Cologne in downtown Siegen, a lovely, off-the-beaten path industrial hub with a thriving university of over 20,000 students. The Locating Media Graduate School (2012-2021) is a German Research Foundation-funded interdisciplinary programme that researches historical and current media practices ‘in motion’ and ‘in situ’ and engages scholars with interests in locational and situational analyses and the development of new methods for the analysis and design of mobile digital media.

Venue

Universität Siegen
Mon. 28 June 2021 - Tue. 29 June 2021
Oral History Workshop (II)
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Oral History Workshop (II)
Monday, 28. - 29 June 2021
The workshop will take place either on the 28th, on the 29th or on both days. More information to follow.
Wed. 07 July 2021
Workshop - "Becoming Digital“
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Workshop – “Becoming Digital“
07 July 2021
More information to follow.
Thu. 08 July 2021 - Fri. 09 July 2021
Conference - "Digital Matters“
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International Conference – “Digital Matters“
Thursday, 08. - 09 July 2021
More information to follow.
Thu. 09 September 2021 - Fri. 10 September 2021
Conference: Synchronizing Data in Organizations
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Conference: Synchronizing Data in Organizations
Thursday, 09. - 10 September 2021
More information to follow...

Past Events

Wed. 25 November 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Claudia Müller, Martin Dickel, Shkumbin Gashi, Heidi Kaspar, Katharina Pelzelmayer, Anita Schürch & Karin van Holten: "Whose Data is it? Positionalisierungen in einem Community Based Participatory Research-Projekt während der COVID-19-Pandemie"
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25 November 2020, 06:00-07:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

 

Wed. 25 November 2020, 03:00-05.00 pm
MGK-Colloquium
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25 November 2020, 03:00-05.00 pm

Presentation: Ranjodh Singh Dhaliwal, Palashi Vaghela

Due to the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the colloquium will be held online until further notice. For further information or registration please contact Tobias Conradi.

Wed. 25 November 2020, 11:00 am -12.30 pm
Media Practice Theory - Online Discussion with Sophie Müntzel (University of Lucerne): "Facing Big Data: some challenges of large-scale textual analyses for sociologists"
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25 November 2020, 11:00 am -12.30 pm

Due to the restrictions because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the lecture will be held asynchronous online on Tuesday 24th November, 5.00 pm (CET). We will meet with Sophie Mützel for an online-discussion Wednesday 25th November, 11.00 am (CET). For registration and further information please contact Tobias Conradi.

 

The rise of big data indicates a “watershed moment for the social sciences”. Not only are we faced with large and multifarious types of data (e.g. texts, geo location, time stamps, entire full-text archives, pictures), often very unstructured, and stemming from all sorts of sources and phenomena, we are also challenged in our theoretical underpinnings of what constitutes the social and how we can analyze it. We are also witnessing the rise of methods that help to identify patterns and relations, and to reduce complexity. Tools and algorithms of computational linguistics, machine learning, and network analysis are challenging the traditional tool kits of social science methods, which work with representative samples, independent observations, statistical significance or analysts’ privileged positions in local settings. The talk discusses some of the challenges large-scale textual data pose to sociological analysis. In particular, it highlights challenges of data construction, algorithmic models of data analysis, and data interpretation using examples of empirical studies.


Sophie Mützel, short bio

Sophie Mützel is Professor of Sociology at the Department of Sociology, University of Lucerne, Switzerland. She teaches on the sociology of algorithms, big data and social media, as well as on metrics in journalism and the digital economy within the study program “Media and Networks”. Her research interests lie in the areas of big data and its analytics, in particular text analytics and network analysis, as well as economic and cultural sociology. She recently finished a book manuscript on “Markets from stories”. She is the PI of the Swiss federal government funded NRP75 project “Facing big data: methods and skills for a 21st century sociology”. She is also part of an interdisciplinary research group on “Mining for Meaning: The Dynamics of Public Discourse on Migration” funded by the Swedish Research Council.  

Sophie studied Political Science at UC Berkeley, Sociology at Cornell University, and finished her PhD in Sociology at Columbia University. After completing her PhD, she held a Jean Monnet Fellowship at the European University Institute, Italy; afterwards she taught and conducted research at Humboldt-University Berlin and at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. She has been a research fellow at Harvard University and held a visiting professorship at the University of Vienna. 

Tue. 24 November 2020, 05:00-06:00 pm
Media Practice Theory - Lecture- Sophie Müntzel (University of Lucerne): "Facing Big Data: some challenges of large-scale textual analyses for sociologists"
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24 November 2020, 05:00-06:00 pm

Due to the restrictions because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the lecture will be held asynchronous online on Tuesday 24th November, 5.00 pm (CET). We will meet with Sophie Mützel for an online-discussion Wednesday 25th November, 11.00 am (CET). For registration and further information please contact Tobias Conradi.

The rise of big data indicates a “watershed moment for the social sciences”. Not only are we faced with large and multifarious types of data (e.g. texts, geo location, time stamps, entire full-text archives, pictures), often very unstructured, and stemming from all sorts of sources and phenomena, we are also challenged in our theoretical underpinnings of what constitutes the social and how we can analyze it. We are also witnessing the rise of methods that help to identify patterns and relations, and to reduce complexity. Tools and algorithms of computational linguistics, machine learning, and network analysis are challenging the traditional tool kits of social science methods, which work with representative samples, independent observations, statistical significance or analysts’ privileged positions in local settings. The talk discusses some of the challenges large-scale textual data pose to sociological analysis. In particular, it highlights challenges of data construction, algorithmic models of data analysis, and data interpretation using examples of empirical studies.


Sophie Mützel, short bio

Sophie Mützel is Professor of Sociology at the Department of Sociology, University of Lucerne, Switzerland. She teaches on the sociology of algorithms, big data and social media, as well as on metrics in journalism and the digital economy within the study program “Media and Networks”. Her research interests lie in the areas of big data and its analytics, in particular text analytics and network analysis, as well as economic and cultural sociology. She recently finished a book manuscript on “Markets from stories”. She is the PI of the Swiss federal government funded NRP75 project “Facing big data: methods and skills for a 21st century sociology”. She is also part of an interdisciplinary research group on “Mining for Meaning: The Dynamics of Public Discourse on Migration” funded by the Swedish Research Council.  

Sophie studied Political Science at UC Berkeley, Sociology at Cornell University, and finished her PhD in Sociology at Columbia University. After completing her PhD, she held a Jean Monnet Fellowship at the European University Institute, Italy; afterwards she taught and conducted research at Humboldt-University Berlin and at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. She has been a research fellow at Harvard University and held a visiting professorship at the University of Vienna. 

Wed. 18 November 2020, 06:00 pm
Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices"- Sarah Sharma (University of Toronto): "A Feminist Medium is the Message in Three Parts"
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18 November 2020, 06:00 pm

The lecture series will be held digitally until further notice. A Zoom-link for the lecture will be made available in advance via the SFB mailing list. Guests are welcome to register via Mail with Damaris Lehmann Send an email

Sarah Sharma is Director of the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology at the University of Toronto and Associate Professor of Media Theory at the ICCIT/Faculty of Information. Her research and teaching focuses on the relationship between technology, time and labour with a specific focus on issues related to gender, race, and class. She is the author of In the Meantime: Temporality and Cultural Politics (Duke UP, 2014). Sarah is currently at work on two projects that take up McLuhan's media theory for feminist ends. The first is a monograph tentatively titled Broken Machine Feminism which explores the relationship between technology and patriarchal cultures of exit. This project argues for the necessity of feminist techno-determinist stance in order to address contemporary power dynamics as they intersect with the technological. The second is an edited book collection, MsUnderstanding Media: A Feminist Medium is the Message (with Rianka Singh), which offers a feminist retrieval of McLuhan's famous adage that the medium is the message.
 
This talk will outline Sarah's work on a feminist approach to McLuhan and her argument for the new possibilities of a feminist techno-determinism.