Upcoming Events

Thu. 18 March 2021 - Fri. 19 March 2021
Workshop: Netzwerke in der Kulturtransferforschung
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Workshop – Netzwerke in der Kulturtransferforschung
Thursday, 18. - 19 March 2021

Gemeinsamer Workshop des IGK Kulturtransfer und 'kulturelle Identität', Freiburg/Moskau und des SFBs Medien der Kooperation

Online/Zoom

 

Organisatoren:

Prof. Dr. Stephan Packard (Köln)
Dr. Sebastian Gießmann (Siegen)

Wed. 28 April 2021 - Fri. 30 April 2021
Workshop "Deixis and Indexicality: Audiovisual Data Practices around Karl and Charlotte Bühler and in early Conversation Analysis" by the Subproject P02
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Workshop “Deixis and Indexicality: Audiovisual Data Practices around Karl and Charlotte Bühler and in early Conversation Analysis” by the Subproject P02
Wednesday, 28. - 30 April 2021

This workshop examines two crucial periods in the history of audiovisual data practices in the social sciences: Film analysis in a group of researchers around Karl and Charlotte Bühler (starting in Vienna, ca. 1924-1938, continued in exile in the USA) and early Conversation Analysis (starting in the 1960s in the USA). We will try to reconstruct practices of producing, processing and analyzing audiovisual data in these research contexts, but we are also interested in their reception, transformation and further development in later years. One shared theoretical motive in both contexts can be found in the related concepts of „deixis“ and „indexicality“. Both concepts have multiple historical precursors, amongst others in the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl, and play a key role in the work of Karl Bühler (deixis) as well as ethnomethodology and CA (indexicality). How they are related to practices of audiovisual sequence analysis is one of the central theoretical questions of this workshop.

Thu. 29 April 2021 - Fri. 30 April 2021
International Virtual Workshop: "Deixis and Indexicality: Audiovisual Data Practices around Karl and Charlotte Bühler and in early Conversation Analysis”
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International Virtual Workshop: “Deixis and Indexicality: Audiovisual Data Practices around Karl and Charlotte Bühler and in early Conversation Analysis”
Thursday, 29. - 30 April 2021

This workshop examines two crucial periods in the history of audiovisual data practices in the social sciences: Film analysis in a group of researchers around Karl and Charlotte Bühler (starting in Vienna, ca. 1924-1938, continued in exile in the USA) and early Conversation Analysis (starting in the 1960s in the USA). We will try to reconstruct practices of producing, processing and analyzing audiovisual data in these research contexts, but we are also interested in their reception, transformation and further development in later years. One shared theoretical motive in both contexts can be found in the related concepts of „deixis“ and „indexicality“. Both concepts have multiple historical precursors, amongst others in the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl, and play a key role in the work of Karl Bühler (deixis) as well as ethnomethodology and CA (indexicality). How they are related to practices of audiovisual sequence analysis is one of the central theoretical questions of this workshop.

Wed. 05 May 2021 - Sat. 08 May 2021
"Geomedia 2021 – Off the Grid": The 4th International Geomedia Conference
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“Geomedia 2021 – Off the Grid”: The 4th International Geomedia Conference
Wednesday, 05. - 08 May 2021 Organized Locating Media | Media of Cooperation

The phrase “off the grid” is commonly understood to refer to the voluntary decoupling from established infrastructure networks such as electricity, water or gas supply. The implication is one of material independence and a self-sufficient lifestyle. Going “off the grid” means making yourself invisible by rebuking the social and technological structures that normally organize our lives. It is entering, or returning to, uncharted territory. The grid from which you disappear is often imagined like a web that we are woven into, at once providing security – of cultural connectivity, opportunities to work, or societal participation – while also limiting individual, political or technological agency.

The grid also speaks to the geographic coordinate system, an all-encompassing global structure which makes it possible to accurately locate any point on earth. This unified grid represents a dominant ordering principle for everything “locatable”. It is part of the technological infrastructure of many platforms, services and applications which fall under the definition of geomedia, most prominently the Global Positioning System (GPS). In this regard, “off the grid” is a move away from such Cartesian notions of space towards a situated relational account of (quotidian) practices carried out with, through, or in relation to, geomedia.

Going off the grid has also been seen as a form of renunciation of the conveniences of the late capitalist (media) world in order to lead a supposedly slower, less stressful and eventually less superficial life – as inspired by the transcendentalism of the likes of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson. But with so many people relying on the grid for purposes of work and entertainment in recent times, what does this mean for our relation to geomedia? What does going off the grid look like now? This presupposes, of course, that there is ipso facto a grid – an infrastructure – which one can connect to freely at any time. But a great number of people do not get to choose to decouple from the grid – a fact that speaks to questions of access to the socio-material infrastructures underpinning geomedia and associated communities and practices.

Arguably, practices of surveillance and countersurveillance concern the implicit or even involuntary participation in corresponding infrastructures. Here, optimization for a range of tasks and activities routinely involves a certain kind of surveillance; a default setting in the running of all kinds of media platforms used for navigation, video streaming or online gaming. In this, surveillance is wrapped up with profit-seeking practices, and the extraction of value from the ‘data fumes’ of platform users, who enter a form of “cooperation without consensus” as they stream movies, hire taxis, host videoconferences, ride public transport, or go on dates. In these various iterations, surveillance might look different, and/or be practiced in distinct ways to traditional forms of state or corporate surveillance, increasingly dependent on technological protocols and standards that not only underpin the grid but also govern our use of geomedia. One consequence is that the relation between private and public spheres is transformed, and introduces new questions of governance, exploitation and marginalization. It is of crucial importance, who is online, and who is offline might as well not exist. Yet these optimization processes are also subject to countermeasures that constitute new modes of existence - from anonymous accounts and the use of VPNs, to location spoofing, and other tricks and techniques to hide, erase, or obfuscate user activity and location.

Yet the grid is not all-encompassing, nor all-powerful. Whilst countersurveillance efforts resist, fight back and oppose, alternative geomedia projects imagine the grid differently – sometimes even plotting its demise. From community broadband initiatives, to independent media organizations, post-capitalist streaming platforms, and citizen science projects; there is a continued, concerted effort to build alternatives to state-based, or company-owned geomedia, operating at various scales from the hyperlocal to the global. Through these efforts, organizers and participants question the foundations of our collective social and technological infrastructures, redefining what it is to care, share, distribute, cultivate or reallocate funds, resources, opportunities and ideas – bringing new geomedia, and new imaginaries of hope (or perhaps fear), into existence.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Caren Kaplan – University of California at Davis, USA
  • Nanna Verhoeff – Utrecht University, Netherlands

Suggested paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Politics, philosophy and ethics of going off grid
  • Grid as Network, Grid as Default (Geomedia and Infrastructure)
  • Physical Geography/Relational Geography
  • Inhabiting Digital Geographies (VR, hybrid spaces)
  • Geomedia in the Global South
  • Urban and Rural Geomedia
  • The ‘geo’ in Geomedia, the ‘media’ in Geomedia
  • Governing Geomedia (smart city, sensor media, infrastructures, surveillance & countersurveillance)
  • Geomedia Activism
  • Digital detox, rationing, quarantine and isolation
  • Geomedia Histories

Geomedia 2021 welcomes proposals for individual papers as well as thematic panels in English.

Individual paper proposals: The author submits an abstract of 200–250 words. Accepted papers are grouped by the organizers into sessions of 5 papers according to thematic area.

Thematic panel proposals: The chair of the panel submits a proposal consisting of 4–5 individual paper abstracts (200-250 words) along with a general panel presentation of 200–250 words.

Conference timeline:

  • October 31st 2020: Submission system opens
  • January 7th 2021: Deadline for thematic panel and individual paper proposals
  • January 25th 2021: Notes of acceptance and registration opens
  • March 15th 2021: Last day of registration

Conference website:

Information about registration, conference programme, venue, social events and practical arrangements will be posted continuously on the conference website starting September 1st:
www.geomediastudies.com.

Contact: You can reach us at info@geomediastudies.com.

Organizers and venue:

Geomedia 2021 is hosted by the Graduate School “Locating Media” and the CRC “Media of Cooperation” at the Department of Media Research, Siegen University, Siegen. The venue is situated east of Cologne in downtown Siegen, a lovely, off-the-beaten path industrial hub with a thriving university of over 20,000 students. The Locating Media Graduate School (2012-2021) is a German Research Foundation-funded interdisciplinary programme that researches historical and current media practices ‘in motion’ and ‘in situ’ and engages scholars with interests in locational and situational analyses and the development of new methods for the analysis and design of mobile digital media.

Venue

Universität Siegen
Mon. 28 June 2021 - Tue. 29 June 2021
Oral History Workshop (II)
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Oral History Workshop (II)
Monday, 28. - 29 June 2021
The workshop will take place either on the 28th, on the 29th or on both days. More information to follow.
Wed. 07 July 2021
Workshop - "Becoming Digital“
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Workshop – “Becoming Digital“
07 July 2021
More information to follow.
Thu. 08 July 2021 - Fri. 09 July 2021
Conference - "Digital Matters“
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International Conference – “Digital Matters“
Thursday, 08. - 09 July 2021
More information to follow.
Tue. 07 September 2021, 14:00-16:00
Workshop „Praktiken der Welterzeugung. Was als Lernen beobachtbar ist“ des Teilprojekts B05
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Workshop „Praktiken der Welterzeugung. Was als Lernen beobachtbar ist“ des Teilprojekts B05
07 September 2021, 14:00-16:00
Thu. 09 September 2021 - Fri. 10 September 2021
Conference: Synchronizing Data in Organizations
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Conference: Synchronizing Data in Organizations
Thursday, 09. - 10 September 2021
More information to follow...

Past Events

Thu. 18 February 2021
Workshop "(Medien-) Historische Forschung im Lockdown: Arbeitsweisen und Methoden in der Pandemie und danach" der Teilprojekte A01 und A02
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18 February 2021

Die ‚Corona-Pandemie‘ hat fundamentale Auswirkungen auf die (medien)historische Forschung. Archive wurden geschlossen oder der Zugang zu Archivalien stark eingeschränkt, Zeitzeug*inneninterviews konnten angesichts von Kontaktsperren nicht mehr oder nur noch sehr beschränkt stattfinden oder mussten – mit allen damit verbundenen methodischen Herausforderungen – ins Digitale abwandern. Das Gleiche gilt für Museen mitsamt ihren Forschungseinrichtungen, die (zumindest vorübergehend) geschlossen oder restriktiven Besuchseinschränkungen unterworfen wurden.

Damit hat die ‚Corona-Pandemie‘ den Druck auf Einzelforscher*innen, Archive, Museen und Universitäten erhöht, sich konsequent auf digitale Forschungs- und Recherchemethoden einzulassen. Ansätze einer digital arbeitenden Geschichtswissenschaft, die teilweise jahrzehntealt sind, wurden mit Nachdruck ausgebaut und intensiviert.

Sosehr die ‚Corona-Pandemie‘ den Erfolg von laufenden Forschungsprojekten und Qualifikationsarbeiten bedroht, sosehr kann sie daher auch als Chance und wirkmächtiger Katalysator hin zu einer (teil-) digitalen medien- und geschichtswissenschaftlichen Zukunft verstanden werden.

Wie die medienhistorische und geschichtswissenschaftliche Forschung und die Präsentation ihrer Ergebnisse zukünftig aussehen werden, lässt sich zum momentanen Zeitpunkt freilich erst erahnen. Archive, Museen und Bibliotheken haben auf die Herausforderungen bislang ganz unterschiedlich reagiert, das Gleiche gilt für (medien-) historische Forschungsprojekte und Historiker. Angesichts der permanent schwankenden Bedingungen konnte eine Evaluation der einzelnen Reaktionen bislang kaum stattfinden. Sicher scheint derzeit nur vorhersagbar, dass es ein simples ‚zurück‘ in eine ‚Vor-Corona-Zeit‘ nicht geben wird.

Wie aber wird die Zukunft der historischen Forschung aussehen? Welche positiven wie negativen Erfahrungen mit digitalen Recherche-, Interview- und Präsentationsmöglichkeiten haben historisch arbeitende Wissenschaftler*innen und Institutionen unter Pandemiebedingungen gemacht? Wie sahen die individuellen Anpassungsstrategien an eine derartig unvorhersehbare Transformation der Arbeitsbedingungen aus? Wie vermeiden wir einen corona gap in der historiografischen Arbeit?

Über solche Fragen wollen wir uns auf einen (digital vernetzten) Workshop offen austauschen. Insbesondere soll es darum gehen, Forschende, Archivare, Museumsangestellte etc. in ein ‚digitales Plenum‘ zu bringen, um aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven in einen Erfahrungsaustausch einzusteigen.

Es soll eben darum gehen, voneinander und miteinander zu lernen – für die momentane Situation genauso wie für die (medien-) historische Arbeit der Zukunft.

 

Zeitplan: (18.2.)

10.00 - 11.00 Uhr Themenschwerpunkt Archiv

Diskutant: Michael Hollmann (Präsident des Bundesarchivs)

11.30 - 12.30 Uhr Themenschwerpunkt Museum

Diskutant: Helmuth Trischler (Leitung Bereich Forschung Deutsches Museum München)

14.00 - 16.00 Uhr Themenschwerpunkt Zeitzeug*innen (auf Englisch)

Diskutant*innen:

Sebastian Gießmann (Universität Siegen)

Thomas Haigh (Universität Wisconsin)

Andrea Ploder (Universität Konstanz)

Valerié Schafer (Universität Luxemburg),

 

Es wird um Anmeldung per E-Mail an matthias.roehr@uni-siegen.de gebeten. Bitte geben sie auch an, ob Ihre Kontaktdaten (Name, ggf. Institution, E-Mailadresse) mit den anderen Teilnehmern geteilt werden darf.

Einige Tage vor der Veranstaltung wird ein Link zu dem Zoom-Raum sowie eine Teilnehmer*innenliste verschickt.

Wed. 10 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
*CANCELLED*Lecture Series "Interrogating Data Practices" - Christian Meier zu Verl (University of Konstanz): "‚Daten über Daten‘. Zur Rekonstruktion eines Pionierprojekts der Sozialwissenschaften."
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10 February 2021, 06:00-07:00 pm
Dieser Vortrag rekonstruiert die methodologischen und methodischen Arbeiten einer Gruppe von interdisziplinären Forscher*innen, die Ende der 1970er Jahre zusammen am Forschungsprojekt „Analyse unmittelbarer Kommunikation und Interaktion als Zugang zum Problem der Entstehung sozialwissenschaftlicher Daten“ (inoffiziell auch „Daten über Daten“-Projekt) gearbeitet haben. Das Projekt wurde von den Soziologen Thomas Luckmann und Peter Gross geleitet und durch die Fritz Thyssen Stiftung gefördert (1977-1981). Dabei war dieses Projekt für die Sozialwissenschaften in Deutschland ähnlich bedeutsam wie das interdisziplinäre Projekt „The Natural History of an Interview“ von McQuown et al., das Mitte der 1950er Jahre in den USA durchgeführt wurde.
 
This lecture will be given in german only.

Die Ringvorlesung wird bis auf weiteres Digital abgehalten. Der Zoom-Link für die Vorlesung wird rechtzeitig über die Mailingliste des SFB zur Verfügung gestellt. Gäste können sich per Mail bei Damaris Lehmann anmelden Sende eine E-Mail

Thu. 04 February 2021
Media Practice Theory - Online Discussion with Karin van Es: "Data walking and other methods emphasizing the situatedness of data"
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04 February 2021
In this talk I consider how data walking can be a productive method studies for the study of data and its infrastructures in media and communication studies. I examine how three affordances of walking (embodied, situated and generative) offer opportunities for different forms of knowledge production (experiential, spatio-temporal and performative). Subsequently, I reflect on data walks within a series of new methods for studying data (and its infrastructures) that all emphasize data as situated and offer a distinct form of criticality. To this end I explore “the walkthrough method” (Light, Burgess and Duguay 2018), “local readings” (Loukissas 2019) “situated data analysis” (Rettberg 2020) but also feminist data visualization (D’Ignazio and Klein 2020).          
 
Karin van Es (@kfvanes) is assistant professor in media and culture studies at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. Her research centers on questions of data, tool criticism in computational methods, and the datafication of public service media. She is co-editor of the open-access volume The Datafied Society (Amsterdam University Press, 2017) and the special issue “Big Data Histories” (2018) for TMG- Journal for Media History. She has published in outlets such as Social Media + Society, Television & New MediaMedia, Culture & Society and First Monday.